Mark Schreiner

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV since 2007.

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992.


Florida may pay for burials of students whose remains were once on the grounds of the now shuttered Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys.

The Dozier School for Boys in the Florida Panhandle town of Marianna closed in 2011, after allegations by former inmates of decades of torture and abuse.

University of South Florida researchers have been working for years to identify dozens of remains found in unmarked graves on the site, and they've just released their final report.

The University of South Florida has already received $17 million from state lawmakers for a new building that would house its medical school and heart health institute in downtown Tampa. 

Now comes word that university officials are going to seek an additional $22.5 million for the project in the next fiscal year - money they say they likely can't finance the project without.

There's an age-old question that plagues our nation’s changing health care system: Are higher health care costs  for patients always associated with higher quality goods and services?

University of South Florida College of Public Health researcher Troy Quast 's work, took on that question, as it pertained to one of the most significant diseases affecting Americans: diabetes. 

His article, "Quality of Care and Relative Resource Use for Patients with Diabetes,” was published in the June issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.


UPDATED WITH ARRIVAL INFORMATION 8/30 11 PM:

USF student Barbara "Barbie" Jimenez returned to Tampa Friday afternoon, where she was reportedly able to walk from a medical transport plane to an ambulance.

The 22-year-old senior was taken from the International Jet Center to Tampa General Hospital, where she will continue recovering from injuries sustained in a car accident in Cuba in early August.

Jimenez and her family didn't say anything reporters Friday, but they said she would speak in the coming days.

USF Beta Gamma chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha

The University of South Florida student stuck in a Cuban hospital because her family doesn't have health insurance may be a step closer to returning home.

Barbara "Barbie" Jimenez, 22, was in a coma for five days after a car accident in Cuba. She's since come out of the coma, but has been stuck in Cuba since her family can't afford to fly her back to the U.S.

Now, according to Congressman David Jolly, a Bay area air ambulance company has offered to bring Jimenez home free of charge.


A University of South Florida senior is in a Cuban hospital following a recent car crash, but she can't return to the United States because her family doesn't have health insurance. 

The National Weather Service, as well as rain-weary residents, continue to keep a cautious eye on numerous rivers around West Central Florida.

With more thunderstorms possible the rest of the week, officials are closely monitoring the Alafia River and the Little Manatee River in Hillsborough County and Cypress Creek and the Withlacoochee River in Pasco County.

USF Health Communications

Officials with the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine say they have the kind of dilemma most schools would envy - a record number of students applying for this year's class.

A total of 5,235 students applied for a slot in the class starting medical school this month, up 24 percent from a year earlier.

In addition, secondary applications, which are sent to students the school is interested in, came in from 2,920 students. That's an increase of 28 percent from a year earlier.

In June of 2013, Robert Stephens of Tampa received a phone call from his sister. She told him that an uncle they had never met had died at the Dozier School for Boys in 1937 under mysterious circumstances.

She added that University of South Florida researchers wanted Stephens to submit a DNA sample to see if they could identify his 15-year-old uncle as one of the bodies believed to be buried in an unmarked graveyard on the now closed reform school’s grounds.

Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers kicker Lawrence Tynes is suing the team, claiming unsanitary conditions at Bucs' facilities led to a MRSA infection that he says ended his career.

In a lawsuit filed in Broward County Circuit Court Monday, Tynes claimed the team "failed to disclose and actively concealed ongoing incidents of infection" among other people at the facility.

UPDATE 3/18/15 10:45 a.m.

Updated headline to indicate the Florida Department of Law Enforcement will conduct "an inquiry" and not "an investigation" into USF's findings.

In an email sent to WUSF 89.7 News Wednesday morning, FDLE Communications Director Gretl Plessinger said, "We are conducting a preliminary inquiry to assess any new information from the January USF report.  If there is criminal predicate, we will open an investigation."

ORIGINAL POST 3/17/15 5 p.m.

With a single sentence, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement indicated it will look into what investigators from the University of South Florida have turned up at the Dozier School for Boys in the Panhandle town of Marianna.

On Thursday, University of South Florida officials will once again ask the Florida Board of Governors to approve their request for $57 million in state funding to build the Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute in downtown Tampa.

Aimee Blodgett / USF News

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, is one of the most dangerous infections around, thanks to its resistance to most treatments, and its ability to easily spread to patients in high-risk areas such as hospitals and nursing homes.

USF Health

Even with Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Tampa Bay Lightning owner Jeff Vinik voicing their support for the plan, the Florida Board of Governors put the University of South Florida's proposed downtown Morsani College of Medicine on hold for the moment.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Gordon "Skip" Beadle has a prosthetic right leg, the tenth such device he’s depended on since the retired U.S. Marine was wounded during the Vietnam War 50 years ago.

"It’s a symbiotic leg. It has a microprocessor in the knee and also the ankle," he said. "This leg in particular gives me a huge amount of balance. Before this leg, I pretty much had to use a cane cause I’d lose my balance. (Now) I can walk without a cane; I can walk uphill, downhill."

Updated at 7:00 p.m. with sound & President Genshaft's letter


USF Health

A new University of South Florida medical school planned for downtown Tampa could be "bigger than baseball," Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn told a group of USF trustees today.

Buckhorn was referring to the possibility that the Tampa Bay Rays could eventually move from Tropicana Field to another field of dreams on an empty lot in downtown Tampa.

He spoke during a meeting of the USF Board of Trustees Health Workgroup at USF's Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation (CAMLS), which would be a gallstone's throw from the new complex.

If the University of South Florida wants more state money to build a new medical school, they first need to decide where they want to build it.

That was the caveat laid down by the Florida Board of Governors' faculty committee at a meeting in Jupiter Wednesday.

Lucielle Salomon / WUSF 89.7 News

In 1934, 13-year-old Thomas Varnadoe and his brother, Hubert, were sent to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys for allegedly stealing a typewriter.

In 1944, 12-year-old Earl Wilson went to the reform school in the panhandle town of Marianna, Florida, for allegedly riding in a car a friend stole.

Neither Thomas nor Earl ever returned home -- until now. Science and perseverance are finally giving their families some peace.

University of South Florida researchers will announce Thursday afternoon that they've determined the identities of two more sets of remains buried on the grounds of the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys.

The Ledger and a release from Senator Bill Nelson's office say that one is Thomas Varnadoe, 13, who died in 1934, a month after arriving at Dozier.

University Beat report on USF St. Petersburg student Dwayne Scheuneman's visit to the West Bank to teach dance to disabled and able-bodied Palestinian teachers and students.

In times of strife, people try to find comfort any way they can—and sometimes, it's in art.

The power of dance was on display for a group of Palestinians in the West Bank recently, and they had a University of South Florida St. Petersburg student to thank for that.

Dwayne Scheuneman, 45, is a senior studying education. The retired U.S. Navy veteran was left a paraplegic after suffering a spinal cord injury in a diving accident almost two decades ago.


  It's taken University of South Florida researchers more than three years to provide one family with an answer they've been looking for, for more than 70 years.

The researchers uncovered remains from 55 unmarked graves on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna last year.  DNA testing has identified one set as belonging to George Owen Smith, who's believed to have died at age 14 -- shortly after being sent to the Florida Panhandle school in 1940.

Since becoming the new senior vice president for USF Health and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine in early May, Dr. Charles Lockwood has sat down with every department he oversees at the University of South Florida.

The former Dean of the Ohio State University's College of Medicine is plotting a course for one of USF's flagship divisions as he takes over from Dr. Stephen Klasko, who led USF Health for nine years before leaving last June to become the president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the Jefferson University Hospital System.


You know the saying about an apple a day keeping the doctor away. Now two USF students are hoping that “one apple” might help keep an entire neighborhood healthy.

Hector Angus and Andrea Little have opened 1Apple Grocery in Plant City, in part to provide relief in a so-called “food desert.”

"A food desert is an area where the residents don’t have access to fresh fruits, or nutritious foods," said Angus, who's pursuing his bachelor's degree in information technology with a minor in business.

"So that’s one of the problems that we’re trying to tackle with 1Apple is being able to provide the fresh produce for the families," added Little, who just completed her third year of medical school.


UPDATED 7/8 with University Beat audio report and additional quotes.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, over half of American girls ages 13 to 17 have received at least one dose of the vaccination to protect against the human papillomavirus (HPV) - and it's a rate that decreases over the needed second and third doses.

Twelve teams of students from eight Florida universities recently faced off at the Second Annual State of Florida Healthcare Innovation Competition to determine whose medical technology reigned supreme -- and the winners walked away with $10,000.

"The competition brings together collegiate healthcare innovators from across the state, and allows them an opportunity to pitch their innovation ideas, concepts, and products before a panel of qualified judges," said Dr. Michael Fountain, director for event co-sponsor, the University of South Florida Center for Entrepreneurship. "In addition to winning cash prizes, these innovations gain insight from these world-class experts to help them move their technologies forward."

A wide variety of products and ideas was pitched, from a Google Glass application for people with cognitive and physical disabilities to a grocery store chain that sells healthy food in low-income neighborhoods.

"I think it speaks, very clearly, to the breadth of what can be done in healthcare innovation, whether it starts out with an application all the way to a small molecule," Fountain added.


Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

You wouldn't know it by looking at her, but Josalyn Kaldenberg has a bionic arm.

Even if you looked hard at her right arm, you'd only see a small scar, a barely noticeable, faint line that starts around her elbow and then runs up her arm. It looks like it could be the result of an injury any 11-year-old like Josalyn would have - maybe she fell off a swing or got injured rough-housing with her four younger siblings back home in Woodward, Iowa.

Dr. Charles Lockwood is changing from a Buckeye to a Bull.

The current Dean of the Ohio State University's College of Medicine has been named the new senior vice president for USF Health and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine.

Lockwood, 59, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and an internationally known researcher in obstetrics and gynecology, will take the helm at USF on May 5th.

He replaces Dr. Stephen Klasko, who left last September after nine years leading USF Health to become the president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the Jefferson University Hospital System.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Despite not having all the funding accounted for yet, ground was broken Tuesday on the USF Health Heart Institute. 

The five-story, 100,000 square-foot facility will sit in the middle of the USF Health campus -- Moffitt Cancer Center and the USF Health Morsani Center take up the other three corners of the intersection where the new Institute will be based.

Pages