Julio Ochoa

Health News Florida Editor

Julio Ochoa is editor of Health News Florida.

He comes to WUSF from The Tampa Tribune, where he began as a website producer for TBO.com and served in several editing roles, eventually becoming the newspaper’s deputy metro editor. 

Julio was born and raised in St. Petersburg, and received a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and worked at a paper in Greeley, Colo., before returning to Florida as a reporter and as breaking news editor for the Naples Daily News.

Contact Julio at 813-974-8633, on Twitter at @julioochoa or email julioochoa@wusf.org.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tobacco settlement money used to prevent people from smoking has been extremely successful.

Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News / Kaiser Health News

Some cities, counties and school districts in Florida and around the country are helping their employees buy cheap prescription drugs from Canada and overseas.

Google Maps

The flu has forced one school in Pinellas County to close and others in the Tampa Bay area to send warnings home to parents.

Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

Donald Trump came into office promising to repeal Obamacare and replace it with something more affordable that would cover everyone. But members of congress couldn't agree on what that should be.

Agency For Health Care Administration

The state is disputing a report that found funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program in Florida will run out in February if Congress doesn't act.

Google Maps

The Agape Food Bank in Winter Haven shut its doors at the end of December.

But some charities believe the change may actually benefit those in need of food assistance in Polk County.

healthcare.gov

More than 700,000 Floridians selected or were automatically re-enrolled in Obamacare plans during the final week of regular enrollment, bringing the state’s six-week enrollment total to 1.73 million.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

During a routine visit at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic, Dr. Ajoy Kumar was going over blood test results with a 46-year-old patient named Paul.

healthcare.gov

Floridians have until December 31st to sign up for a health insurance plan through Obamacare, thanks to Hurricane Irma.

iStock

Roughly one in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, which is why screening for the disease is so important.

But some women can't afford a yearly mammogram.

A statewide program that screens for breast and cervical cancer has helped thousands of low income women between the ages of 50 and 64 with early detection. Only there isn’t enough money to make it through the year.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The University of South Florida has formed a partnership with a network of hospitals to train more doctors in the Tampa Bay area.

As travelers head to airports during the busy holiday week, airport security officials have a message: Don’t try to bring your guns on the plane.

healthcare.gov

Obamacare enrollment is off to a strong start in Florida and around the nation, according to national data and those who help people sign up for health insurance.

Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

Dr. Ronald Cirillo and his assistant at the Turning Points free clinic in Bradenton are testing another patient for hepatitis C.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

When patients come to The Outreach Clinic in Brandon, one of the first people they encounter is Jackie Perez.

Florida Blue

Florida’s largest provider of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act responded today to the federal government’s decision to stop funding subsidies that keep costs low for some consumers.

Florida Hospital

Florida Hospital has purchased about 100 acres along Interstate 4 in Lakeland where it plans to build a freestanding emergency room and eventually a 200-bed hospital.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

The C130's four propeller engines scream as it lifts off from MacDill Air Force base in Tampa.

The plane is loaded with pallets of medical supplies bound for St. Croix, nine days after the largest of the U.S. Virgin Islands took a direct hit from Hurricane Maria.

Humanitarian flights to the islands of St. Croix and Puerto Rico are continuing in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Crews based at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa on Friday loaded a cargo plane with supplies and headed for St. Croix, where patients from island hospitals were picked up and taken to a Columbia, South Carolina hospital

healthcare.gov

Health insurance rates on the Obamacare marketplace in Florida will increase by an average of 45 percent in 2018.

Kaiser Family Foundation

A proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act would cost Florida $9.7 billion in federal funding over six years, according to a study from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Georgetown University

Recent efforts in Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare are overshadowing an important deadline to fund children's health insurance.

UF Health

Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a new therapy that they hope could lead to a cure for multiple sclerosis.

Julio Ochoa/WUSF

A mild stroke sent St. Petersburg resident Lori Ngo to the hospital in May.

She was feeling a pain in her leg, but didn't think much of it.

healthcare.gov

A Florida organization that helps people sign up for insurance through the federal marketplace will have its funding cut by nearly $1 million.

Hal Yeager for Kaiser Health News

For the millions of people who are still without power across Florida, heat illness can be a concern.  

HHS.gov

A public health emergency was declared for Florida on Thursday ahead of Hurricane Irma.

U.S. Army

As Texas recovers from Hurricane Harvey, Floridians may be wondering how well the state could weather a similar storm.

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

A proposal by two senators to replace Obamacare would be particularly bad for Florida, costing the state billions of dollars over the next 10 years, a new study says.

Suncoast Community Health Centers

Community health centers that serve poor patients around Florida are worried that new restrictions on state and federal funding could hurt their ability to provide charity care.

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