Jim Ash

Jim Ash is a reporter at WFSU-FM.  A Miami native, he is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience, most of it in print.  He has been a member of the Florida Capital Press Corps since 1992.

Ash has worked variously as a reporter, columnist and bureau chief.  His specialties include state politics, the judicial system and the environment.  His career has included coverage of everything from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster and Hurricane Andrew to the Florida presidential recount.

Ash is a graduate of the University of Iowa where he earned a degree in English.  He spent his summers interning for newspapers, including the Austin-American Statesman in Texas.

A hiking enthusiast, Ash has explored most of the public trails in California's Big Sur.  He is an avid reader who enjoys traveling, exploring the Big Bend, and water sports.

Jolted by a “60 Minutes” expose, some Florida lawmakers want to deal with a blizzard of so-called “drive-by” Americans With Disabilities Act lawsuits.

The House Majority Leader says there’s a chance a hydraulic fracturing bill could pass the Florida Legislature this year.

Environmental groups are raising concerns about the Senate’s dramatically expanded plan to fight massive toxic algae blooms carpeting South Florida waterways.

The Senate is moving ahead with a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing, despite industry threats of a blizzard of lawsuits. But as Jim Ash reports, the House remains a big question mark.

Environmentalists say the latest peer-reviewed study by the group Science for Nature and People Partnership, underscores the need in Florida for a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Workers compensation isn’t the sexiest item on the 2017 legislative agenda, but it promises to be one of the fiercest fights as lawmakers face enormous pressure to deal with a 14.5 percent rate hike hitting every state employer.   

Florida hospice providers are joining a call by nursing homes to preserve the so-called certificate of need process.

Democratic lawmakers are calling for a 10-year moratorium on black bear hunting in Florida.

Higher workers’ compensation rates in Florida are likely here to stay, warns a key player in the Florida Senate.

A perennial battle between the business lobby and trial attorneys is heating up in the Florida Senate.

Accurate numbers are hard to come by, but state and federal wildlife officials are raising their official estimate of the number of endangered Florida Panthers.

Senator Anitere Flores has spoken out against hydraulic fracturing in Florida, voted against it and written guest editorials. But the Miami Republican is sending her strongest message yet.

While President Donald Trump’s immigration restrictions and Supreme Court pick dominate the headlines, many Floridians are focused more intently on Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s nomination as head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Republican Senator Dana Young of Tampa is making good on her campaign promise to file a statewide fracking ban.

With a series of legal challenges still hanging fire, environmental groups are asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to reject Florida’s controversial water quality standards.

A prominent Tampa Republican is making good on her promise to seek a ban on hydraulic fracturing in Florida.

Senate President Joe Negron’s $2.4 billion plan to protect South Florida waterways from another toxic-algae sliming received a Luke-warm legislative debut. Behind the scenes, the South Florida Water Management District was launching torpedoes.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Jon Steverson is insisting his department followed the book when it adopted highly controversial new water quality standards.

A Panhandle environmental group opposed to Florida’s sweeping new water quality standards is asking a federal judge to intervene.

This summer, more than 215 million gallons of wastewater poured into the Floridan Aquifer when a sinkhole opened up at the Mosaic fertilizer plant in Polk County.

Lawmakers are vowing to strengthen public notice requirements for toxic spills after an administrative law judge struck down an emergency rule by Governor Rick Scott.

After feeling the wind in their hair for 16 years, Florida motorcycle riders would have to strap on helmets again if Republican Representative Don Hahnfeldt of The Villages has his way.

Senate President Joe Negron is getting high marks from environmentalists for his campaign to clean up Lake Okeechobee runoff, but the Port St. Lucie Republican isn’t willing, at least yet, to ban hydraulic fracturing in Florida.

Even before President-elect Donald Trump named Rex Tillerson, Rick Perry and Scott Pruitt for coveted Cabinet posts, the men topped the environmental movement’s 10 most wanted list.

After Florida voters gave the nod to pro-conservation candidates and saw through the utility industry’s $25 million campaign to squelch solar power, environmentalists say the time is right for a complete ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Democratic Senator Bill Montford of Tallahassee is warning fellow lawmakers that a dramatic spike in workers’ compensation rates isn’t just a business problem.

Senate leaders are promising to take a comprehensive approach to overhauling Florida’s workers’ compensation system as business groups rail against a pending 14.5 percent rate hike.

Employers are worried the fallout from recent Supreme Court rulings will go beyond a hefty rate hike for workers’ compensation insurance.

Florida Senator Bill Nelson, a fellow Democrat and a fellow Shuttle astronaut, took to the Senate Floor Thursday to honor the memory of former Senator John Glenn.

Florida businesses are up in arms about a hefty workers compensation rate hike, and now lawmakers are worried about the fallout for school districts.

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