Jim Ash

Jim Ash is a reporter at WFSU-FM.  A Miami native, he is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience, most of it in print.  He has been a member of the Florida Capital Press Corps since 1992.

Ash has worked variously as a reporter, columnist and bureau chief.  His specialties include state politics, the judicial system and the environment.  His career has included coverage of everything from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster and Hurricane Andrew to the Florida presidential recount.

Ash is a graduate of the University of Iowa where he earned a degree in English.  He spent his summers interning for newspapers, including the Austin-American Statesman in Texas.

A hiking enthusiast, Ash has explored most of the public trails in California's Big Sur.  He is an avid reader who enjoys traveling, exploring the Big Bend, and water sports.

Concerned about the 53 million cars on U.S. highways with unresolved recalls, the National Safety Council is launching a new website.

Florida is no longer the only state that regulates what doctors say to their patients about guns.

A state appeals court has decided Florida’s fledgling marijuana industry needs a little more sunshine.

A new report by the American Civil Liberties Union is raising questions about the state’s handling of last summer’s toxic algae blooms in South Florida. 

President Donald Trump’s plan to slash billions of dollars from Medicaid would hit small town America hardest, especially in Florida, according to a new Georgetown study.

Activists are abandoning a federal challenge of Florida’s water quality standards after the Trump Administration refused to step in.

Momentum is building for an unusual, do-it-yourself special session on medical marijuana, although the legislator behind it admits he faces long odds.

Conservation groups, Governor Rick Scott and Cabinet members are praising Florida’s newest top environmental regulator, Noah Valenstein, as a consensus builder dedicated to public service.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson just left an Arctic Council meeting in Anchorage without saying whether the U.S. will pull out of the Paris accords. Meanwhile, climate change activists say Florida should pay attention to the council's latest report.

Governor Rick Scott’s recent emergency declaration means some 3,000 addicts in Florida will soon be getting access to opioid blockers like methadone, suboxone and naltrexone, health officials say.

Florida’s most powerful business groups want lawmakers to go back to the drawing board after an appellate court upheld a 14.5 percent hike in workers’ compensation insurance.

Governor Rick Scott is approving a 1.5 billion-dollar reservoir South of Lake Okeechobee, much to the delight of Senate President Joe Negron.

Chances appear slim lawmakers will pass a comprehensive workers’ compensation bill this year, but at least one reform is already headed to Governor Rick Scott’s desk.

Employer groups are threatening to bolt and trial lawyers are in open revolt as lawmakers spend the final days of the 2017 session haggling over workers’ compensation reforms.

Spurred by a 60-Minutes investigation, the Florida Legislature is moving to shut down a cottage industry of shady lawsuits that has grown up around the Americans with Disabilities Act.

It may be hard to pronounce, but medication synchronization is an idea whose time has come, at least according to some Florida lawmakers.

Organizers acknowledge the political origins of the Tallahassee March for Science, but they are also touting the Earth Day Event as a non-partisan celebration of cold, hard facts.

By scaling back the cost and size of a proposed reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee, Senate President Joe Negron appears to be making progress with critics. But a deal seems far from certain.

The fate of a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing appears sealed now that a powerful Republican is calling it quits.

Jolted by a “60 Minutes” expose, some Florida lawmakers want to deal with a blizzard of so-called “drive-by” Americans With Disabilities Act lawsuits.

The House Majority Leader says there’s a chance a hydraulic fracturing bill could pass the Florida Legislature this year.

Environmental groups are raising concerns about the Senate’s dramatically expanded plan to fight massive toxic algae blooms carpeting South Florida waterways.

The Senate is moving ahead with a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing, despite industry threats of a blizzard of lawsuits. But as Jim Ash reports, the House remains a big question mark.

Environmentalists say the latest peer-reviewed study by the group Science for Nature and People Partnership, underscores the need in Florida for a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Workers compensation isn’t the sexiest item on the 2017 legislative agenda, but it promises to be one of the fiercest fights as lawmakers face enormous pressure to deal with a 14.5 percent rate hike hitting every state employer.   

Florida hospice providers are joining a call by nursing homes to preserve the so-called certificate of need process.

Democratic lawmakers are calling for a 10-year moratorium on black bear hunting in Florida.

Higher workers’ compensation rates in Florida are likely here to stay, warns a key player in the Florida Senate.

A perennial battle between the business lobby and trial attorneys is heating up in the Florida Senate.

Accurate numbers are hard to come by, but state and federal wildlife officials are raising their official estimate of the number of endangered Florida Panthers.

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