primary care

So your doctor has told you some of the scariest words you can possibly hear: You need surgery. What do you do next?

If you need an emergency surgery, like an appendectomy or a procedure after an accident, you usually don't have much choice in the matter. You'll likely get it done in the hospital where you went to the emergency room, unless the hospital isn't equipped to do it. If that's the case, you'll get transferred.

Direct Primary Care Teed Up For Final Approval

Mar 8, 2018
WGCU

The Florida Legislature is poised to pass a bill that would create the “statutory footing” for direct primary-care agreements among physicians, patients and employers.

The solo practice family doctor is becoming less and less common. But a local primary care group is surviving the test of time, and celebrating twenty years of service. WFSU sat down with some of the doctors there to find out how healthcare has changed in the past two decades.

Florida State University is considering whether to open a primary care clinic near Sabal Palm Elementary school. The move would give students in the university’s medical school clinical experience.

Managing Depression A Challenge In Primary Care Settings, Study Finds

Mar 8, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

Often referred to as the “common cold of mental health,” depression causes about 8 million doctors’ appointments a year. More than half are with primary care physicians. A new study suggests those doctors may not be the best to treat the condition due to insurance issues, time constraints and other factors.

Though the majority of Americans have a primary care doctor, a large number also seek treatment at urgent care centers, statistics show. For many people, the centers have become a bridge between the primary care doctor's office and the hospital emergency room.

Obamacare Insurers Sweeten Plans With Free Doctor Visits

Jan 4, 2016

Health insurers in several big cities will take some pain out of doctor visits this year — the financial kind.

They’ll offer free visits to feprimary care doctors in their networks.

Wikimedia Commons

Sarasota County will get an another year to transition its public health clinics to a private company, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports.

Four dozen health centers around the state that provide a medical home for uninsured low-income Floridians and for those who are newly insured through the Affordable Care Act will get a share of $13.4 million in federal funds, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced Friday afternoon.

Most of the grants fell into the range of $150,000 to $400,000, but a few of them were for more:

·         Community Health of South Florida in Miami, about $507,000.

·         Manatee County Rural Health Services in Palmetto, about $499,000.

Image courtesy of imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Nurse practitioners, who want more "autonomy," will tell a legislative committee Friday morning that granting it would benefit Floridians.

Primary-care physicians are in short supply, they'll say, so it's only sensible to make full use of nurses who have postgraduate training.

Physicians will tell the committee they agree on the need for new approaches to expand primary care. But the Florida Medical Association says "the best solution is physicians and nurses working collaboratively in a way that does not jeopardize patient safety."

Sixteen community health centers in Florida will share more than $8.3 million in new grants -- enough to care for about 73,000 new patients -- from the Affordable Care Act, federal health officials announced today. 

More than half of the grants are for amounts exceeding $500,000.

The Florida awards are part of a nationwide package of $150 million in "New Access Point" grants to 236 centers. They were announced by officials at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).

Will Vragoic / Tampa Bay Times

The gigantic retirement community known as The Villages -- with almost 100,000 residents who like getting around in golf carts -- has teamed up with the University of South Florida to create medical homes with an old-time friendly style of primary care, the Tampa Bay Times reports

Bill Branson / National Cancer Institute

A shortage of primary care doctors exists across much of Florida, not just in small, rural counties, the Associated Press reports. According to federal data, communities in Miami, Tampa and Orlando don’t have enough primary care physicians, either. 

Several physicians have reached out recently to discuss attractive employment offers from health systems. They are invariably conflicted. They understand the trade-offs, that they’ll give up the autonomy they’ve become accustomed to in exchange for more money and fewer practice management headaches. On the down side, they’ll be accountable for generating significant revenues, sometimes independent of care appropriateness.