Daylina Miller

Health News Florida Reporter

Daylina Miller is a multimedia reporter for WUSF and Health News Florida, covering health in the Tampa Bay area and across the state.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist at The Tampa Tribune in 2005, and has since worked as a reporter for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle, the Tampa campus newspaper.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University and through the program started Dames & Dice, a tabletop gaming blog.

When you step inside the Creative Behavior Solutions clinic in Largo, the first thing you notice isn't what you can see, it's what you can hear – the sound of children laughing, clapping and singing.

Florida Blue has teamed up with Walgreens to offer free flu shots every Thursday in October from 10 a.m. until noon on a first-come, first-served basis.

A new law will takes effect next month that expands workers’ compensation benefits for firefighters, paramedics, EMTs, law enforcements officers and other first responders.

Workers comp for those professions will now include post-traumatic stress disorder.

The Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation filed a lawsuit against Florida Gov. Rick Scott to get public records related to the state's Medicaid AIDS care contracts. 

Public schools across Florida opened their doors to residents last year during Hurricane Irma evacuations.

Pinellas County Schools were recently reimbursed more than $2.6 million by the federal governrment for the cost of food, fuel, staff, custodial supplies and floor coverings.

More than one in four Floridians is considered obese, according to the latest “State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America" report.

Florida also ranks fourth highest in the nation when it comes to obesity rates for youth ages 10 to 17. (Read the full report for Florida and the nation.)

Red tide arrived in Pinellas County over the weekend with numerous reports of dead fish along beaches from Fort DeSoto to Clearwater. 

The University of South Florida St. Petersburg’s College of Education received a $2.2 million grant for a new statewide training program for K-12 schools.

USF St. Pete will work with the Florida Department of Education to help school personnel identify the signs of emotional distress, mental health difficulties and substance abuse disorders - then connect those students with resources.

Registered nurses at 15 HCA-affiliated hospitals in five states, including Florida, have voted to authorize nurse negotiators to call a strike if the issues RNs have been raising in ongoing contract negotiations remain unresolved, the National Nurses Organizing Committee announced.

It's been almost a year since Hurricane Irma impacted Central Florida in mid-September - but the damage it did is still being calculated.

Florida's Community Health Centers were given $5,504,658 in federal Quality Improvement grant awards - a 16.8 percent increase from last year.

Hillsborough County has joined the state of Florida in suing 14 opioid manufacturers and distributors, including Purdue Pharma - the maker of Oxycontin.

Hillsborough County is filing a lawsuit against drug companies that contributed to the opioid addiction crisis.

Gov. Rick Scott announced Friday that Florida Department of Children and Families Secretary Mike Carroll is leaving the agency effective Sept. 6.

Pinellas County Commissioners unanimously passed a resolution Tuesday asking Florida lawmakers to take another look at the state's "Stand Your Ground" law.

Human papillomavirus infections are so common that nearly all men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point in their lives.

But fewer than 60 percent of Florida children are getting vaccinated – earning the state a “D” grade from the CDC.

Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

Florida was one of several states last year to declare a state of emergency because of opioid abuse. But despite efforts by state and federal officials, some local teens don't feel like enough is being done to help students.

The Pasco County Sheriff’s Office says it’s the first law enforcement agency in Florida to partner with the U.S. Institute Against Human Trafficking to use new software to catch people soliciting sex online -- particularly those looking for child victims.

A new online tool could help some Florida families quickly determine how much health insurance for their children will cost.

Following statewide expansions of insurance programs, more kids than ever have access to health care, according to the latest Florida Kids Count report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

But the report’s authors are concerned that could change if children are undercounted in the 2020 census.

Several Florida Department of Health locations are recognizing Wednesday, June 27 as National HIV Testing Day with free testing throughout the week.

A mosquito-borne illness originally found in the Tampa Bay area has been confirmed in a human for the first time, according to University of Florida researchers.

Months after Gov. Rick Scott approved new rules for nursing homes and assisted living facilities, much of the industry is not in compliance as hurricane season gets underway.

More than 150 patients on the Florida medical marijuana registry lined up outside Trulieve’s new location on U.S. 19 in New Port Richey Wednesday morning for a grand opening discount of 25 percent.

A new study finds that health care spending is reduced by about 10 percent when patients using Medicare Advantage and Medicaid managed care plans  are connected to social services to help with things like housing, medical transportation, healthy food programs, and assistance with utility bills.

Tampa strip club owner and cancer patient Joe Redner is vowing to take his fight to grow medical marijuana for his personal use to the Florida Supreme Court.

A new report by the Florida Association of Community Health Centers shows the centers provided care to more than 1.4 million patients last year, and made a $2 billion economic impact, returning $1.78 for every state-invested dollar.

At a recent visit to the University of South Florida ALS Clinic — amid appointments with neurologists, respiratory therapists and more — Leigh Hotle worked with her social worker to nail down a date for her next peer support group meeting.

On 100 acre stretch of land, seven houses sit in various stages of construction. The exposed, wooden beams are decorated with motivational quotes and Bible verses like, "Where the spirit of the Lord is, there is Freedom” from Corinthians.


The opioid epidemic has become so severe it’s considered a national public health emergency, and a recent report suggests it could be linked to a higher rate of children in foster homes.

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