nursing homes

A walker rests beside a small nursing home bed.
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Florida National Guard-led teams have conducted more than 3,700 tests in 21 nursing homes as part of efforts to stop the spread of COVID-19 at long-term care facilities.

Florida health officials have suspended the license of two nursing home administrators and placed a moratorium on new residents at Cross Landings Health and Rehabilitation Center in Jefferson County. 

Nursing homes and other so-called long-term care facilities in Northeast Florida are receiving help from a state emergency team to curb COVID-19 outbreaks. 

More than four dozen long term care facilities in the greater Tampa Bay region have patients who have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus.

Over the weekend, the state of Florida released the names and counties with nursing homes and assisted-living facilities who had patients or employees test positive for Covid-19. The more than 300 locations include 53 facilities in Pinellas, Pasco, Polk, Sarasota, Hillsborough and Manatee Counties.

The state began on Saturday releasing the names of nursing homes and assisted living facilities where there are confirmed cases of COVID-19, Gov. Ron DeSantis announced.

Three people who were evacuated from a nursing home in Seminole have died from COVID-19, according to the medical examiner's office in Pinellas County. The patients, an 84-year-old woman, 74-year-old man and 66-year-old man were among dozens of people who were evacuated after the virus spread through the nursing home.

In some parts of the U.S., the desperate need to slow the spread of the coronavirus is coming into conflict with the scramble to find more hospital beds.

Nursing homes have been the sites of some of the earliest — and deadliest — outbreaks of COVID-19. Some people who run such facilities are understandably leery of accepting new patients who might spread the virus.

Nonetheless, some of the largest states are now ordering nursing homes to accept patients who have been discharged from the hospital but are still recovering from COVID-19.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

After shocking instances of nursing homes failing to disclose the existence and extent of COVID-19 cases within their facilities, the federal government will require nursing homes to inform residents, their families and representatives when residents or staff contract the illness.

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For weeks, Gov. Ron DeSantis has warned repeatedly about the devastating toll that COVID-19 could have on Florida’s seniors and the potential impacts on nursing homes and other facilities for vulnerable residents.

Feds Under Pressure To Publicly Track Nursing Home Outbreaks

Apr 16, 2020
Close up of elderly woman in wheelchair having her hand held.
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Federal health officials are coming under increasing pressure to start publicly tracking coronavirus infections and deaths in nursing homes amid criticism they have not been transparent about the scope of outbreaks across the country that have already claimed thousands of lives.

Nursing Homes Get Extension On Payments

Apr 16, 2020
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Florida nursing homes, strapped for funds amid the coronavirus pandemic, have been given an extension on paying $36 million in taxes to the state.

Older hand holding another hand
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Gov. Ron DeSantis’s administration was caught by surprise Tuesday to learn that a 30-day executive order banning visitation at nursing homes was set to expire.

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The number of reported COVID-19 infections at nursing homes and assisted living facilities has quintupled during the past week, increasing to 380 cases in 41 Florida counties.

State Looks To Head Off COVID-19 In Long Term Care

Apr 3, 2020

Florida health officials said Thursday that preventing “community spread” of the novel coronavirus through the state’s long-term care industry has become a top concern.

Federal Inspectors Eye Florida Long-Term Care Facilities

Apr 1, 2020
Older hand holding another hand
NPR

Federal health inspectors Tuesday arrived in Florida to evaluate how long-term care facilities are responding to the spread of the novel coronavirus.

A walker rests beside a small nursing home bed.
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A resident of a long-term care facility in Collier County has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, according to data released Thursday by the state.

empty bed in a nursing home
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"Social distancing," ending visitation at nursing homes and shuttering nearly all gathering places could have a devastating effect on the people many of the measures are meant to safeguard: older adults, who are already at risk of isolation and loneliness.

The state is sending paramedics to long-term care facilities to randomly test asymptomatic staff and residents for COVID-19.

A fourth person who could have been exposed to coronavirus at an assisted-living facility in Fort Lauderdale has now been hospitalized, a fire official says.

Gov. Ron DeSantis expanded an emergency order prohibiting all visitation to nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other long-term care facilities for the next 30 days.

The World Health Organization has formally declared the coronavirus a pandemic. The move comes as higher education officials have directed universities prepare to suspend in-person classes and shift toward online learning. As fears of contagion spread, Governor Ron DeSantis is now limiting access to nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

A walker rests beside a small nursing home bed.
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Florida nursing homes will see a $74.8 million increase in their Medicaid rates beginning July 1 under an agreement reached by legislative health-care budget writers.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is ordering health inspectors to focus on infection-control practices at nursing homes and hospitals, particularly those where coronavirus infections have been identified among patients or in the community, CMS administrator Seema Verma announced Wednesday.

A Florida group is pushing back on a federal Medicaid proposal, that among other things, would to charge nursing homes a new bed tax.

The VA Aid and Attendance benefit can help some vets and spouses pay for nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home health care. But the application process is often long and complicated.

Some states call them assisted living facilities; others, residential or personal care homes. These state-licensed facilities promise peace of mind for families whose elders require long-term care. In Vermont and elsewhere, investigations into these homes have revealed lax oversight, injuries and deaths.

Few understand the risks like June Kelly. Her mother, Marilyn Kelly, was energetic and loved to go fishing when she moved into Our House Too, a 13-bed facility that advertised its memory-care expertise. Over the next eight months, almost everything went wrong that could.

Health Spending Plans Favor Nursing Homes, Drug Importation

Jan 30, 2020

House and Senate budget writers have rolled out health-care spending plans for the coming year that would set aside money in key areas such as nursing homes and drug importation but still have wide differences. 

Older hand holding another hand
NPR

House Speaker Jose Oliva recently referred to hospitals and other health care providers as modern-day “robber barons,” but a proposed spending plan unveiled Tuesday does not propose Medicaid reductions to the providers’ bottom lines. 

Music means a lot to Patricia R. When she sits in her chair and hears the music, she is reminded of her dad.

“See, my father had a bar when I was growing up. So when they had the country music band come, he'd say to me, ‘go out and dance Pat’. And I was like, eleven, twelve years old. I used to go out there and dance,” she said.

Patricia has dementia (we are not using her full name to protect her privacy).

The state has received 67 notifications about proposed projects for new or expanded nursing homes, hospice programs and facilities for people with developmental disabilities. 

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