health care reform

Republican efforts in Congress to “repeal and replace” the federal Affordable Care Act are back from the dead. Again.

The Capitol Hill health care fight sure seemed dead. After Republican proposals to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, failed to pass a Republican-controlled Congress, lawmakers looked poised to move on to other topics, like a tax overhaul. But this week, proposals from both the left and the right are grabbing headlines.

Affirming its disdain for "Obamacare," the Trump administration on Thursday announced sharp cuts in programs promoting health care enrollment under the Affordable Care Act for next year.

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

A proposal by two senators to replace Obamacare would be particularly bad for Florida, costing the state billions of dollars over the next 10 years, a new study says.

Insurer Fills Last Hole In Obamacare Marketplaces For 2018

Aug 25, 2017
Healthcare.gov

The lone U.S. county still at risk of leaving shoppers with no choices next year on the federal health law's insurance marketplace has landed an insurer.

Ohio-based insurer CareSource will step up to provide coverage in Paulding County, Ohio, in 2018, the company and the state Department of Insurance announced Thursday.

healthcare.gov

Consumers who want to enroll in Obamacare for 2018 will have less help and a shorter time to do it.

Residents of Congressional District 26 gathered outside of Rep. Carlos Curbelo’s office on Thursday morning for a “Welcome Home” rally now that the representative has returned to South Florida for the August recess.

The organizers of the rally said  Curbelo, a Republican, has been evading their requests to host and attend a town hall on the health care needs of the district.

A group of centrist lawmakers is set to begin work on a bipartisan health care bill. Meanwhile, public opinion is tilting in favor of government involvement in health care, with a third of Americans supporting a single-payer system.

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

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The Senate effort to undo the Affordable Care Act failed dramatically early Friday morning, with Sen. John McCain casting a deciding "no" vote. The promise of repeal has animated the Republican Party for seven years, and the defeat was a devastating loss for the GOP and President Trump.

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The U.S. Senate is immersed in work on reforming healthcare, and at the same time dismantling the Affordable Care Act. And the chamber faces a long road ahead.

Florida’s two senators voted on either side of the measure, as expected. Republican Marco Rubio has been a longtime opponent of ACA.

People might be forgiven for thinking that the Affordable Care Act is the federal government's boldest intrusion into the private business of health care.

But few know about a 70-year-old law that is responsible for the construction of much of our health system's infrastructure. The law's latest anniversary came and went without much notice in August.

Florida Senate

Bills that involve state workers' health insurance, nurse-practitioners and hospital regulations died during this week's Legislative special session because the Senate has declined to consider them.

Senate Health Policy Chairman Aaron Bean said in a statement Monday evening that his colleagues felt there wasn't time to consider major policy changes by Friday, the last day of the special session called to finish work on a state budget.

The issues contained in the House bills require "a thorough and proper vetting," said Bean, R-Fernandina Beach.

Megan Milanese

Christian Ward lounges on a couch in the University of South Florida student center in Tampa. He props crutches against the armrest and stretches out his leg, which is covered in a cast up to his thigh.

Like a lot of college students, Ward’s parents handle his health insurance. He'll tell you that having it definitely came in handy during his moment of need.

Virtual health care such as mobile apps, telemedicine and electronic records are part of the surge toward more consumer-friendly medicine, health executives tell the Orlando Sentinel. Florida Blue Chairman Pat Geraghty said 2014 marks a major shift in health delivery.