Florida Legisature

Florida Legislature To Tackle Death Penalty Sentencing Issue

Oct 19, 2016
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For the second consecutive year, Florida lawmakers will attempt to fix the state's death-penalty sentencing scheme in response to court rulings finding that the process is unconstitutional.

A study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says Florida ranks as number one in the nation for vehicle-related drownings. And, that’s why one Florida lawmaker says he’s happy the Governor signed “Chloe’s Law.”

Putting behind a year's worth of rancor, the Florida Legislature on Friday will approve a more than $82.3 billion budget that includes a slight boost in money for schools but also rejects many of Gov. Rick Scott's main priorities.

Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a new pathway to sentence someone to death Monday. These changes came nearly two months after the U.S. Supreme Court took issue with Florida’s old system for handing down the sentence in the Hurst v. Florida case.

This week the U.S. Supreme Court heard a case challenging a Texas law that requires abortion providers have admitting privileges.  Meanwhile similar legislation is marching through the Florida Capitol.

A House committee passed a bill Monday that would ban nearly all abortions in Florida, but even backers of the bill say its chances of passage, or of surviving a court challenge if it became law, likely are slim.

State lawmakers are taking steps to protect seniors from guardian abuse.  Sen. Nancy Detert (R-Venice) says it’s too easy for private guardians to take advantage of their wards.

This year’s legislative session will look at a number of bills involving medical marijuana. The state created an outline for its initial medical marijuana industry in 2014. It allows for the production of a non-euphoric strain of cannabis. Now, some legislators want to expand the current program – or just create an entirely new system.

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An appeals court ruled Friday that state universities are allowed to ban students from having guns in their dorm rooms.