disease

We don't usually think of adorable puppies as disease vectors, but they might actually be making people sick. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a Campylobacter outbreak in people and its link to puppies purchased from a chain of pet stores.

The U.S. thought it wiped out hookworm decades ago. But a new study shows that it never truly went away.

Hookworm thrives in regions of extreme poverty with poor sanitation and affects some 740 million people worldwide. Developing nations with warm, moist climates, in regions like South America, South Asia and Southeast Asia, are most susceptible to the worm.

Last summer Felicia Keesing returned from a long trip and found that her home in upstate New York had been subjected to an invasion.

"There was evidence of mice everywhere. They had completely taken over," says Keesing, an ecologist at Bard College.

It was a plague of mice. And it had landed right in Keesing's kitchen.

Disease Threatens FL Roses

Aug 24, 2015
Wikimedia Commons / WMFE

Florida’s $20 million rose industry is threatened by a disease that’s devastating the flower across the Eastern United States.

All the attention on Florida State University head football coach Jimbo Fisher and Monday night’s National Championship win is secondary to his 8-year-old son's affliction with a rare blood disease, his wife tells the Palm Beach Post. Candi Fisher said the family would give up all of their success if it meant Ethan Fisher no longer lived with Fanconi anemia, a genetic condition diagnosed only about a couple dozen of times each year.

Shrinking public health budgets in Florida and other states are making it harder to protect and control potential infectious outbreaks, according to a new report.

Florida scored five of 10 possible points on the Trust for America’s Health report released this morning. Georgia, Nebraska and New Jersey received the lowest score: two out of 10. New Hampshire was the top scoring state, earning points for eight of the 10 criteria.

John Sajo

Medical marijuana supporters and foes are eager to find out if they swayed Florida’s Supreme Court justices considering a proposed state ballot referendum. 

As Health News Florida reported Thursday, judges appeared most curious about how the ballot language defined disease and medical conditions. The court must approve the language before it can be placed on the November ballot.

Florida Supreme Court justices who will decide whether medical marijuana will come up for a vote next November kept asking the same question over and over in a hearing Thursday morning:

What is the difference between a "disease" and a "medical condition" (and should the state leave it up to physicians to decide)?

The ballot language -- limited to a brief summary of the six-page amendment --says a "yes" vote would allow "the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases..."  The title would be:  "Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions."

To find a cure for obesity-related diabetes.  The three-year agreement was announced Tuesday, the Orlando Sentinel reports.  Research will take a new path; rather than looking for another form of insulin or other diabetes medication, researchers will look for a way to possibly cure the disease, which affects 10 percent of American adults.

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Jul 17, 2013

Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as, say, malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.

The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.

Officials with the Hillsborough County Health Department confirmed that a University of South Florida student has tuberculosis, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

About 90 people who came into contact with the student will be tested for the disease. The last time TB was reported on the USF campus was in May 2012.

Obesity Is A 'Disease.' Now What?

Jun 21, 2013

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, you've heard about gay marriage and affirmative reaction cases before the Supreme Court, but we'll talk about another important case that isn't getting a lot of attention in just a few minutes. But first, over the past few decades, obesity has become a serious health care issue in the United States. The obesity rate was 13 percent in 1962, it now stands at 34 percent of adults and 17 percent of children.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Obesity has long been recognized as a public health problem. But this week, the American Medical Association, the nation's largest professional organization of physicians, has taken the step of officially recognizing obesity as a disease.

NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us now to talk about what this means. Hi, Alison.

ALLISON AUBREY, BYLINE: Hi there, Robert.

SIEGEL: What's the significance of declaring obesity a disease?

John Pendygraft / Tampa Bay Times

Two-year-old Savannah Hurst’s parents know that any day can be her last. The little girl has metachromatic leukodystrophy, a rare genetic disease with no cure, and she will likely die before she turns 3. As the Tampa Bay Times reports, her family is trying to cram a full life for her into just a few months’ time. 

Tampa Bay Times

As the director of the University of South Florida’s MS Center explains, there’s no cure but there are new treatments for multiple sclerosis, which affects more than 2 million people worldwide, the Tampa Bay Times reports. The disease is in the news because it claimed the life of Annette Funicello, an actress and former Mouseketeer, this week. 

 

It may cost less to do business in places where there's what some people call a culture of health. And that's put Colorado, which has the lowest rates of adult obesity in the country, on the map for companies looking to relocate or expand.

Kelly Brough is making the most of it. She runs the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, and she's creative about luring businesses to relocate to Colorado. She runs a "Colorado loves California" campaign, for instance.

Tuberculosis Cases In The U.S. Keep Sliding

Mar 22, 2013

The U.S. is slowly but steadily closing in on tuberculosis.

For the first time since the government started tracking the disease in the 1950s, the number of annual TB cases has dropped below 10,000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Whitney Ostwalt and her brother Jordan have a disease so rare it baffled doctors until All Children's Hospital ran genetic tests and found MPS III or Sanfilippo syndrome, which has no known cure or treatment.