Apalachicola Bay

The legal fight between Florida and Georgia over water flow into the Apalachicola River will move before the full U.S. Supreme Court.

Supreme Court To Get More Input In 'Water War'

Mar 21, 2017
State Library and Archives of Florida

Florida's "water war" with Georgia is not over. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that more legal briefs will be filed in the case, including allowing Florida to contest a special master's report that recommended a ruling in Georgia's favor.

Earlier this month, a U.S. Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against Florida in its decades-long water war with Georgia. As the court prepares to make its final decision, lawmakers are going back to the legislative drawing board. WFSU News went to the coast to see what the ruling means for the struggling Apalachicola Bay and its world famous oysters.

North Florida Congressman Neal Dunn wants to throw out a federal plan that would reduce freshwater flowing into the struggling Apalachicola Bay. The move comes after a Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against the state in the decades-long water war with Georgia. The Court has not yet made a final ruling. But Dunn and his colleagues are going back to the legislative drawing board to challenge the Army Corps of Engineers.

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Florida's lawsuit seeking to limit the amount of water its neighbor Georgia can take from a shared river system.

The court's decision Monday to hear the case was applauded by Florida officials, and marked a new chapter in the decades-long regional battle over rights to take water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint river system.

Environmentalists are warning wildlife officials that Apalachicola Bay is in serious trouble and will die without fresh water.