Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA)

8:23 am
Fri November 7, 2014

Court Backs AHCA On Medicaid Payments

Lead in text: 
An appeals court says Florida Hospital Orlando should repay more than $22,000 in Medicaid payments it claimed in the care of a 3-year-old child with leukemia, the News Service of Florida reports. The judges said Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration was justified in requesting repayment in the case that centers around the state’s determination of whether care is a “medical necessity,” according to the News Service.
  • Source: Usf
  • | Via: News Service of Florida
An appeals court Thursday sided with the state Agency for Health Care Administration in a dispute about whether Florida Hospital Orlando was paid too much for treating some Medicaid patients. The agency in December issued an order requiring the hospital to repay $22,138 in Medicaid overpayments, along with a $500 fine and $7,635 in costs.
HNF Stories
10:30 am
Fri December 13, 2013

AHCA Disputes Long-Term Care Story

Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration has publicly accused Health News Florida of making "inaccurate and incomplete statements" about Medicaid's shift of the elderly and disabled into managed care.

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HNF Stories
11:24 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Long-Term Care Transition Bumpy

Florida’s unprecedented transition to managed care for its most fragile Medicaid patients is working, but questions remain about its benefit down the road, according to a report from Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute released today.

About 40 different individuals involved in the early phases of shifting elderly and disabled Medicaid patients into managed care plans told researchers they are most concerned that more than a third of participants failed to select a plan. Those patients were automatically enrolled in a plan.

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In Depth
11:10 am
Mon January 14, 2013

Rollout Posted for Frail Elderly to Enter HMOs

The region that includes Orlando and Melbourne will be the first in the state to enroll its frail elderly patients who are on Medicaid into managed-care plans, the Agency for Health Care Administration announced Monday.

A map on AHCA's website offers a guide as to which counties are included in the rollout, which hinges on approval by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for Florida's requests for a waiver of federal law for its Statewide Medicaid Managed Care program. 

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In Depth
7:47 am
Thu January 10, 2013

New Report Slashes Cost Estimate on Medicaid Expansion

AHCA Secretary Liz Dudek released the report.

After two days of heavy criticism, Gov. Rick Scott’s administration released  a new, much smaller estimate of the cost of expanding Florida Medicaid late Wednesday night. The new report pegs the price tag at about $3 billion.

At the most, if all those eligible signed up, it would cost the state $5 billion over a decade, the new report says. That is less than one-fifth the cost that Scott has been citing.

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In Depth
7:16 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Scott to Look at Other Medicaid Cost Estimates

Scott Communications Director Melissa Sellers

Gov. Rick Scott is willing to look at estimates on the cost of Medicaid expansion other than the ones he has been using, according to a release  Tuesday evening.  

The statement from Scott's Communications Director Melissa Sellers came in apparent reaction to Health News Florida’s report early Tuesday headlined “Legislative Analysts told Scott His Medicaid Estimates Are Wrong (But He’s Using Them Anyway).”

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In Depth
12:23 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Legislative Analysts Told Scott His Medicaid Estimates Are Wrong (But He's Using Them Anyway)

Scott embraces controversial AHCA report.
Credit Associated Press

The state’s chief economist has warned the staff of Gov. Rick Scott that his Medicaid cost estimates are wrong, but Scott keeps using them anyway, according to e-mails obtained by Health News Florida  (Update: Scott to Look at Other Estimates).

Scott says he opposes expanding Florida Medicaid because it would cost too much: $63 billion over 10 years, he says, with the state paying $26 billion of that.

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