Tim Fanning

Tim Fanning is a WUSF Public Media Stephen Noble intern for spring 2018.

He is a junior at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, studying journalism and digital communication with a primary focus on print journalism. Tim worked as the managing editor of The Crow's Nest, USFSP's student newspaper, and has been an intern and weekend reporter for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Tim played bass in a heavy metal band and loves to travel to places off the beaten path. In 2016, he backpacked in eastern Europe for three months, and walked from Portugal to Spain along the Camino de Santiago. In his spare time, he devours too much dark chocolate and collects newspaper clippings of bizarre things that happen in Florida.

When he was 5, he wanted to grow up to be a starfish. Now he's set his sights on journalism and hopes to cover city and county government.

After the deadly school shooting in Parkland, teenage voices rang through the television sets, radios and newspapers of senior citizens in Sun City Center.

On Saturday, some of those seniors are holding a rally to show their support.

Local governments in Florida can't regulate guns and city leaders who don’t abide by state law can face up to a $5,000 fine or removal from office.

Ignited by the deadly shooting in Parkland, tens of thousands of Tampa Bay area teenagers plan to demonstrate for gun reform on Saturday. Beyond making a statement, many of the students hope to register and mobilize young people to vote.

That’s the main message behind Tampa’s demonstration, which takes place at 10 a.m. at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, said organizer Brooke Shapiro.

Emergency 911 lines were knocked out in seven counties last month in the Tampa Bay area for several hours. On Wednesday, telecommunication company Frontier Communications and one of its contractors addressed the reasons for the crippling of emergency phone lines.

When a gunman killed 17 people on Valentine's Day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, many of their classmates didn't grieve in silence, they spoke out.

Urgent teenage voices filled television interviews, social media, even the hallways of Florida's capitol. They have also sparked a debate over gun laws in the aftermath of another school shooting.