Roberto Roldan

Roberto Roldan is a senior at the University of South Florida pursuing a degree in mass communications and a minor in international studies.

He has previously worked with the Tampa Bay Times, WMNF and The (Louisville, Ky.) Courier-Journal, where he covered the wedding ceremonies in Kentucky of plaintiffs in the historic same-sex marriage case before the U.S. Supreme Court. In Tampa, he's covered everything from violent crime in Tampa’s university neighborhoods to the local music scene.

When he's not out reporting, Roldan enjoys seeing local bands and spending time in the outdoors.

It’s been a year since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico. Recovery continues on the devastated island, but transitions are also happening here in Florida, where many residents evacuated and some have chosen to stay.

Many Puerto Rican’s lost everything when Hurricane Maria made landfall on Sept. 20, 2017. Tens of thousands of people made the decision to take what belongings they had left and travel to the mainland. Many have started new lives in Central and South Florida. These new Floridians already have had significant influence on political races, the public school system and affordable housing.

This week on Florida Matters, we'll hear the stories of two people who chose to make the Tampa Bay area their new home:

The Largo Police Department is rolling out new technology that will make it easier to search for Alzheimer's sufferers who are prone to wandering.

State officials are providing more money to Southwest Florida counties affected by the red tide outbreak that is sending waves of dead fish onshore and into neighborhood canals.

On the five-month anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, some of the students brought their "Road to Change" bus tour to Tampa.

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico last September, Julio Ildefonso and his mother watched as their wooden home in Bayamón was blown away.

The federal program that has provided hotel vouchers to Puerto Rican families displaced by Hurricane Maria will end on Saturday, and advocates are worried some Tampa Bay families will be left with nowhere to go.

With new bars and restaraunts going up in Downtown Lakeland, one city commissioner thinks allowing people to walk the downtown streets with alcoholic beverages could be a boon for businesses.

A group of activists marked Gun Violence Prevention Day over the weekend with an annual speaking and voter registration event at The Portico in Downtown Tampa.

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn wants to divest the city's employee pension fund from companies that make guns and ammo.

 

A recent staff review found that about $300,000 of the more than $800 million pension portfolio is linked to these kind of companies, according to city spokesperson Ashley Bauman. The decision to divest is ultimately up to the seven-member retirement board that oversees Tampa's employee pension fund.

Susana Matta Valdivieso was hiding in a dark classroom when a gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Madison Vogel had never organized a protest before.

But following the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, the Osceola High School senior got together with 35 other Pinellas County students and created a companion event to a national march against gun violence.

The possibility of stricter gun laws loomed large over the first gun show in Tampa Bay since the Parkland school shooting,