Quincy J Walters

Quincy Walters is a reporter and backup host for WGCU.

He started in public radio as an intern at WUSF, the NPR member station for the Tampa Bay area. A year later, he was a production intern for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered in Washington, D.C. After Quincy’s internship, he returned to WUSF as a reporter.

His stories have aired on Weekend All Things Considered.

Quincy earned a degree in English with a concentration in creative writing from the University of South Florida.

It’s been over two months since Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, but Floridians are still dealing with mold and many are just now discovering they have it.

Hundreds of people flocked to a gun show in Fort Myers this past weekend. Sunday also marked a week since the largest recorded mass shooting in modern U.S. history, where 58 people were shot and killed at a music festival in Las Vegas. 


President Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget have some people on edge, especially in Florida. People associated with the Environmental Defense Fund or EDF aired grievances Tuesday morning. The proposed budget goes into effect Oct. 1, but  people from the EDF say now is the time to act.

Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection used ground penetrating radar on several plots of land in a predominantly black section of Fort Myers this week. For decades the City of Fort Myers used one of the plots to dump lime sludge, a by-product of water a treatment plant. That lot is being tested, along with nearby private properties and water wells, after residents found out and became concerned.

You may have heard of feral cats, but have you heard of feral chickens? Feral chickens are now the subject of evolutionary research. And the ones in Tampa's Ybor City and Key West are perfect fodder to study. 


The City of Fort Myers held a workshop this week to inform residents about what kind of testing will be done on a dump site in a predominantly black neighborhood.  Back in the 1960's, the City  dumped a byproduct from a water treatment plant in an empty lot in the neighborhood known as Dunbar. For decades, the city didn’t tell residents what that byproduct was. It included arsenic. 

Toxic algal blooms have been happening more often in the rivers off Lake Okeechobee. One of the main causes is phosphorous runoff from wastewater and farmland. But a new filter may make algal blooms caused by wastewater a thing of the past. 

At Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Naples, the landscape is quintessential Florida. There's the marsh area with towering cypress trees and there's the wet prairie. 

It's what Florida looked like hundreds of years ago. And it's one of the places where people were tallying butterflies for the North American Butterfly Association's (NABA) summer count. 

The infrastructure that prevents Lake Okeechobee from spilling over is old. And that's why Congress allocated $49.6 million to help repair it this fiscal year. 

U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL), who's the founder and Co-Chairman of the Everglades Caucus, toured the Herbert Hoover Dike on Lake Okeechobee Monday. He got an update on the dike's rehabilitation projects from the Commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville district. 

When law enforcement finds buried, decomposing human remains, there are often more questions than answers. That’s where forensic anthropologists come in.

Florida Gulf Coast University’s Forensic Anthropology department trained  Air Force Special Investigations agents Friday.

Hurricane season is looming and so is the deadline for the National Flood Insurance Program to be reauthorized. 

When a child dies, it affects a whole community. That's why every other month, people from hospitals, law enforcement and health departments review cases of criminal or accidental deaths of kids. It's called the Child Death Review. Monday, the group focused on accidental deaths in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry and Lee counties, because it says those deaths go up as school gets out for summer. 

  Saturday is "Lionfish Awareness and Removal Day" in Florida. Lionfish are an invasive species off Florida's coasts. People in southwest Florida are studying the fish's impact and others are helping to keep the invasive species' population under control. 

A Collier County non-profit mental health and substance abuse program for kids has opened up a new program that offers intensive daily therapy and doesn’t require hospitalization. It's the first kind in the area. 

Evacuations due to wildfires have been lifted in Lee and Collier Counties.  7000 acres burned in Collier at 30th Avenue in Golden Gate Estates that was 50% contained as of Sunday afternoon. Three homes were destroyed.  The cause of that fire is still under investigation.  The News-press reports an arson investigator says a fire in Lehigh Acres, which destroyed 4 homes may have been caused by a cigarette. WGCU’s Quincy Walters spent the weekend keeping up with the changing conditions in Collier.