NFL

Brandon Oliver / Wikimedia Creative Commons

A federal judge in Connecticut has dismissed a lawsuit by 60 former professional wrestlers, many of them stars in the 1980s and 1990s, who claimed World Wrestling Entertainment failed to protect them from repeated head trauma including concussions that led to long-term brain damage.

WMFE

A former NFL and University of Florida football player has been sentenced to nearly 22 years in prison for a health care fraud scheme that prosecutors say bilked the federal government out of about $20 million.

Wikimedia Commons

The NFL's new rule outlawing a player from lowering his head to initially make any sort of hit with his helmet likely will be included in replay reviews for officials.

Depending on whom you ask, finding out whether your genes make you a better athlete or give you healthier skin may be as easy as swabbing your cheeks for a DNA test on your way into a football game. But others say these "wellness" tests marketed directly to consumers are modern snake oil — worthless, or even misleading.

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration gave a boost to direct-to-consumer genetic testing when it announced plans to streamline its approval process.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be.

An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players.

Lawyers representing 142 retired NFL players filed a federal lawsuit against the NFL Monday in Fort Lauderdale.

They want the league to recognize CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, as an occupational hazard that should be covered by workers compensation.

Tony Gaiter, 42, is the lead plaintiff in the suit.

He played for the University of Miami, before going on to play for the New England patriots and the San Diego Chargers.

A doctor who will be portrayed by actor Will Smith in the upcoming movie, "Concussion," told a Tampa audience how his research into brain injuries has dramatically changed how professional football approaches players.

AP

Researchers studying a degenerative disease in former athletes say 11 of 12 brains of deceased former NFL players tested over the past year showed signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, continuing a trend they've been tracking.

Tampa General Hospital & USF Health Bariatric Center

Many people struggle with their weight, and former athletes are no exception.

But athletes who gain weight once they retire are at a higher risk for serious medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure. That's why four retired NFL players, including two from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, teamed up as part of a weight loss study by Tampa General Hospital and the USF Health Bariatric Center to tackle their obesity.

New Tool Used to Diagnose Concussions

Jan 8, 2015
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine med.miami.edu

According to a report from the NCAA, a little more than seven percent of injuries in college football are concussions. 

The term concussion started to gain steam in the American vernacular a few years ago. Former high-profile players had committed suicide and some wanted to link the player's deaths to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. The death of former Pittsburgh Steelers player Mike Webster is seen as the incident that launched the CTE debate.

Tampa Tribune

The National Football League won’t have to admit any wrongdoing in a settlement with the more than 4,500 players who sued the league for downplaying the dangers of concussions they sustained while playing professional football, the Palm Beach Post reports.

NIAID / Flickr

Two Tampa Bay Buccaneers football players are fighting MRSA infections, a type of staph infection that's resistant to some antibiotics. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control, athletic facilities are especially risky for MRSA infections, given the close physical contact and the likelihood of cuts and scrapes during practices. 

Will Vragoic / Tampa Bay Times

Two Tampa Bay Buccaneers players are being treated for staph infections, the Tampa Bay Times reports. MRSA is resistant to some antibiotics and is spread through contact with an infected person. More answers to frequently asked questions about MRSA available here