immigrants

The Supreme Court will decide this month whether the Trump administration can include a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census, and Florida Republican Congressman Greg Steube says he believes the court will decide to include the controversial query.

Rep. Steube of Florida’s 17th congressional district, the Sarasota area, said Friday on The Florida Roundup that opposition to the citizenship question amounts to "a lot of Democratic political posturing."

Last September, the Trump administration unveiled a controversial proposal — a policy that, if implemented, could jeopardize the legal status of many immigrants who sign up for some government-funded programs, including Medicaid.

Long before he began studying for a career in health care, Marlon Munoz performed one of the most sensitive roles in the field: delivering diagnoses to patients.

As an informal interpreter between English-speaking doctors and his Spanish-speaking family and friends, Munoz knew well the burden that comes with the job. He still becomes emotional when he remembers having to tell his wife, Aibi Perez, she had breast cancer.

WMFE

The Senate Judiciary Committee is demanding answers from federal immigration officials about the Trump administration's separation of migrant children from their families and its struggle to reunite them, a fraught effort that's drawn election-year criticism from both parties.

Wikimedia Commons

Police in Florida say they've arrested six people who bound themselves with bicycle locks outside a federal office in a protest of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The Trump administration has told a federal judge that it has reunited more than 1,000 parents with their children after the families were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border, but it has lost track of hundreds more parents.

The data, submitted in a court hearing on Tuesday, suggests that, by the government's accounting, it will largely meet a second deadline imposed by the judge to bring eligible immigrant families back together.

Michael Rivera/Wikimedia Commons

Municipal workers, including police officers, in one Florida city won't be able to ask about someone's immigration status under a new policy.

NASA Worldview / Wikimedia

With hurricane season in full swing, staff at Florida's evacuation shelters are busy making preparations like what to do for specials needs evacuees and where to send victims of domestic violence. But this year they're practicing for a new issue — what to do if immigration officials want to take a look around.

Hundreds of protesters representing 23 advocacy groups rallied on Saturday against the Trump administration’s family separation policies at a Homestead detention center for children who crossed the Southern U.S. border.

Chants of “Hey, Trump, leave the kids alone!” remained steady throughout the protest, even when it began to rain heavily. Many of those leading chants were children themselves.

Rachel Osborn knows kids who slept in the immigrant detention centers in Texas that have dominated recent headlines.

"We have kids who will say that was the worst part of their journey," Osborn says. "They were traveling for weeks and the hardest part was being in this freezing cold room where, you know, they were fed a cold sandwich and had a thin blanket to shiver under."

And they had no parent or caregiver to comfort them and make them feel safe.

Gage Skidmore (Flickr)

Trump administration officials have been sending babies and other young children forcibly separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border to at least three "tender age" shelters in South Texas, The Associated Press has learned.

Screenshot from Bill Nelson's Youtube Channel.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a "cover-up" after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions.

A central Florida company has no comment about its contract to run a federal detention center for migrant children.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Tampa Bay Times

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Maria RodriguezOregon Health & Science University and Jens HainmuellerStanford University

As Trump Targets Immigrants, Elderly Brace To Lose Caregivers

Mar 26, 2018
Melissa Bailey/KHN

After back-to-back, eight-hour shifts at a chiropractor’s office and a rehab center, Nirva arrived outside an elderly woman’s house just in time to help her up the front steps.

Nirva took the woman’s arm as she hoisted herself up, one step at a time, taking breaks to ease the pain in her hip. At the top, they stopped for a hug.

“Hello, bella,” Nirva said, using the word for “beautiful” in Italian.

“Hi, baby,” replied Isolina Dicenso, the 96-year-old woman she has helped care for for seven years.

On a rare rainy night in Albuquerque, two dozen students are learning the proper way to care for older people. Teacher Liliana Reyes is reviewing the systems of the body — circulatory, respiratory and so on — to prepare them for an upcoming exam.

These students are seeking to join a workforce of about 3 million people who help older adults remain in their homes. They assist these clients with things like bathing, dressing, and taking medication on time.

Workers' Comp Bill Could Aid Injured Immigrants

Feb 21, 2018
Mercedes Marler (Flickr)

A Senate committee Tuesday narrowly approved a bill that would eliminate part of Florida law that allows employers to deny benefits to injured workers who use other people’s Social Security numbers or identification to obtain jobs.

For Some Refugees, Women’s Health Care Is A Culture Shock

Sep 28, 2017
AP

Dinnertime is nearing, and the kitchen in this tidy home in Buffalo, New York, is buzzing. Lamyaa Manty, a 29-year-old Iraqi refugee, wears a neon-pink T-shirt and stirs a big pot of eggplant, onion, potatoes and tomatoes on the stove, a staple of Iraqi cooking called tepsi.

Court Sides With State On Immigrant Emergency Care

Jul 7, 2016
WMFE

An appeals court has sided with the state in a long-running dispute about Medicaid payments to hospitals that provide emergency care to undocumented immigrants.

Lynn Hatter/WFSU / WFSU

A change in government procedures has led to a big jump in people losing coverage under the Obama health care law because of immigration and citizenship issues.

More than 200,000 immigrants who bought insurance through President Barack Obama's health care initiative could lose their coverage this month if they don't submit proof this week they are legally in the country, but language barriers and computer glitches are hindering efforts to alert them.

The government mailed letters in English and Spanish last month notifying about 300,000 people that if immigration and citizenship documents aren't submitted by Friday, their coverage under the Affordable Care Act will end Sept. 30.

Because of the U.S. Supreme Court decision and Florida’s anti-Obamacare politics, legal immigrants will qualify for subsidies on health plans in this state even as citizens under the poverty level get turned away. 

As The Associated Press reports from Miami, many low-income uninsured are baffled that they don’t qualify for a tax credit.

Miami lawmakers are proposing a bill that would eliminate the five-year waiting period before children of legal immigrants can enroll in Florida KidCare, the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau reports (paywall alert).

State Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah, and state Rep. Jose Felix Diaz, R-Miami, say changing the rule would allow about 26,000 low-income children to get health coverage subsidized by state and federal funds. 

Licensed navigators and certified application counselors are facing additional challenges as they help Florida’s Hispanic population sign up for health insurance on the new exchanges, the Tampa Tribune reports. About a half-million people are being targeted by Hispanic Health Initiatives, which does outreach in Orange, Osceola, Seminole and Volusia counties.

Two young adults who were brought to this country illegally as children turned themselves in so they could investigate accusations of human rights abuses inside a privately-operated 700-bed facility for illegal immigrants.