zika

While mainland South Florida ramps up its battle against the mosquito that can carry Zika, the Florida Keys has already begun the region's most intensive mosquito control operation.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are updating their guidance for pregnant women regarding the Zika virus. The new information means asymptomatic pregnant women don't have to get the commonly used IgM test. The announcement comes as public health officials are increasingly worried about the risk of false positives. 

When he had a landscaping business, Bob Hartmann grew 200,000 orchids and thousands of other plants on his three acres in Southwest Ranches, about 15 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale.

 


Zika Cases Continue To Increase

Jul 25, 2017

Florida has reported six additional cases of the Zika virus during the past week, bringing the total to 113 in 2017, according to numbers posted Monday on the state Department of Health website.

The case counts are low, but Zika's still a threat.

That was the message of a meeting of county and state mosquito control officials Monday in Doral.

Florida Zika Cases Top 100 This Year

Jul 14, 2017
Oxitec

Florida has had 101 cases of the mosquito-borne Zika virus this year, with most involving people who brought the virus into the state after being infected elsewhere, according to numbers posted on the state Department of Health website.

A federal judge has dismissed a request to stop aerial spraying of the pesticide Naled in Miami-Dade County, describing the plaintiffs' complaint as "poor" and recommending they get a lawyer before pursuing further legal action.

Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

There’s a downside to the rainy season in Florida: Mosquitoes.

Orange County Mosquito Control has seen a tenfold increase to about 100 calls for service every day.

Miami Beach Doctor Files Lawsuit To Stop Mosquito Spraying

Jul 6, 2017

A Miami Beach doctor who last year helped spearhead angry opposition to using the pesticide naled has filed an emergency request in federal court to stop Miami-Dade County from conducting aerial spraying in its seasonal battle against native marsh mosquitoes.


Weeks after a study linked a pesticide used for mosquito control to slight motor delays in babies, officials in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties say they plan to use that pesticide in aerial spraying scheduled in the coming week.

designer491 / Getty Images

The Zika virus may not seem as big a threat as last summer but don't let your guard down — especially if you're pregnant or trying to be.

Study: Zika Hurt Miami Businesses

Jun 29, 2017
MARK HEDDEN / WLRN

Zika took a bite out of business revenue in last year's outbreak of the mosquito-borne disease in Miami-Dade County, according to a new study from Florida International University.

Zika Cases Mostly Travel Related

Jun 22, 2017
WMFE

As summer officially started Wednesday, Florida has had 84 reported Zika infections this year — with the vast majority of them classified as “travel related,” according to information posted online by the state Department of Health.

Mix-Up Leaves Pregnant Woman In Dark About Zika Risk

Jun 21, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Hospital officials in Washington state have apologized after failing for months to inform a pregnant woman she was likely infected with the Zika virus that can cause devastating birth defects.

To address a growing population of black salt marsh mosquitoes, Miami-Dade County officials will conduct aerial mosquito spraying Thursday night beginning at 8 p.m.

The salt marsh mosquitoes don’t transmit the Zika virus but do bite humans and can spread heartworm to dogs. County officials say they’ve recently seen large numbers of the mosquitoes in their traps, and have received numerous complaints from callers.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

On a hot, sunny Saturday morning at the Upper Tampa Bay Regional Public Library, Kathy and Dani Dahlberg walk up to a white truck holding portable fish tanks that emit a loud hum.

The new homeowners are trying to describe the size of their pond to Hillsborough County Mosquito Control officials.

Summer is upon us and that means more of the bugs that made international headlines last year – mosquitos. What progress has been made in the fight against the Zika virus? Can we cure Zika, or prevent it? And what can residents do to help?

It's June, it's hot, it's rainy -- and that means mosquitos are once again coming out in full force.

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about how the state and its residents are preparing for the potential threat of mosquito-borne illnesses like the Zika virus.


Zika In America: One Mother’s Saga

Jun 13, 2017
Heidi de Marco/KHN

When her daughter was born at Providence St. Peter Hospital in January, the first thing Maria Rios checked was the baby’s head.

She’d seen the terrifying photos on the internet — infants in Brazil and in Puerto Rico whose skulls were misshapen, even collapsed, ravaged by the Zika virus that has engulfed Latin America.

Zika may have fallen from headlines, especially with everything going on in politics these days, but the threat remains.

And recommendations for pregnant women haven't changed: Pregnant women — and those trying to get pregnant — should not travel to places where the Zika virus is circulating.

It's just too risky because Zika can cause birth defects.

But what about babies? Or kids? Is it safe to travel with them?

There's no doubt about it: Zika is on the retreat in the Americas.

In Brazil, cases are down by 95 percent from last year. Across the Caribbean, outbreaks have subsided. And in Florida, the virus seems to have gone into hiding. Health officials haven't investigated a new Zika case for more than 45 days in Miami-Dade County.

Wikimedia Commons

A report released Thursday shows Zika had about the same impact on birth defects in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories as it did in other places hit by the epidemic.

The pesticide widely used to fight Zika-carrying mosquitoes in Florida and across the nation has been linked to deficits in motor functions in Chinese babies, according to a new study.

Ozlem Yaren

Florida scientists have developed a new test for Zika that would produce results in less than an hour.

And the test can detect the Zika virus in the blood of humans or mosquitoes.

Zika is a scary virus because of the terrible birth defects it can cause. Now scientists have a clearer sense of the size of that risk.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified 2,549 pregnant women with the Zika virus in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories between Jan. 1, 2016 and April 25, 2017. The CDC found that 122 of these women — about 5 percent — gave birth to babies with birth defects such as small heads (known as microcephaly).

Hoping to get ahead of potential Zika outbreaks, Planned Parenthood of Collier County is launching a new education initiative aimed at prevention. While anyone is a target for a mosquito carrying the virus, the awareness program aims to help women protect their unborn children from the virus in underserved communities like Immokalee.

Matti Parkkonen (Wikimedia Commons)

Summer is quickly approaching, and that means more of the bugs that made international headlines last year -- mosquitos. What can residents do to prepare for the Zika virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses?

Florida Matters wants to hear from you. 

Wikimedia Commons

Seven babies have been born in Florida with birth defects linked to the Zika virus.

Mosquito Control: Tips for the Rainy Season

Jun 1, 2017

Drain and cover. That's the message Miami-Dade County mosquito control specialists want the public to hear. 

Mosquitos can lay more than 100 eggs at a time, and they do so in standing water. Even a bottle cap of water is big enough.

Mosquitos can carry the West Nile virus and the Zika virus, among other things. 

WMFE

There are fewer Zika cases in Florida compared to this time last year.

This year, 50 Floridians have caught Zika while traveling, and four people have caught the virus locally – but officials think they caught it in 2016.

In Florida, seven babies were born with evidence of Zika Congential Syndrome, which includes microcephaly, a severe birth defect of the brain.

The U.S. Army has been developing a Zika vaccine, but some are raising concerns that the private drug company that will manufacture it will make it too expensive.

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