food insecurity

North Florida Congressman Al Lawson is launching his Let’s Feed America campaign, which aims to reduce hunger by expanding eligibility and making it easier for those in need to receive access to food. Lawson says 1 out of 4 people in the fifth congressional district have been on the SNAP Program or food stamps this year.

A new legislative proposal could require Florida schools to distribute free or reduce-price meal applications to all students, not just those in need. The bill applies to schools in the national school lunch program or the breakfast program.

Rows of brightly colored chairs are set up on the little patch of grass outside FANM, the Haitian Women of Miami, a non-profit group that helps low-income families.

People sit in the Miami heat--some with toddlers in their laps--waiting to fill out FEMA applications and see what other kinds of help they can get in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Days after Hurricane Irma battered South Florida, Rufus James walked through his Liberty City neighborhood in Miami looking for paid work to chop down trees and clean up yards.

Like many Floridians, James, 57, was going on day four with no electricity. At home, he had three grandchildren to feed. They’re eating “cornflakes and whatever we can come up with. I’m looking for some food,” he said.

Before the storm, James said he worked odd jobs — helping elderly neighbors mow their lawns or move heavy items. Post storm, no one was paying for help yet.

In an effort to help those who struggle with food insecurity the latest Leadership Tallahassee class has created what it calls “Little Free Food Pantries.” Kevin Forsthoefel is a member of the group.

Floridians in need can now use a mobile app to locate food banks and support services across the state. 

Saturday (6/17) was the annual Family Fun Day at Walker Ford Community Center, in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Tallahassee. Not only were there the obligatory bounce house and face-painting, but a mobile food pantry was there as well.

For some kids, summer break brings on a haunting reality: Where am I going to get my next meal?

According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, more than half of Florida’s public school students are eligible for free or reduced priced meals during the academic year. Yet during summer vacation, the need for healthy, fresh foods can actually increase. But some local community groups are teaming up to try and fill in the gap.

Polk County is a place of so many contradictions. It's the home of beautiful lakes, charming downtowns and historic landmarks. But this birthplace of several of Florida's governors, was also named by one recent study as having the country's second largest percentage of people struggling to avoid hunger.


On a recent Tuesday, the weekly produce market co-op at the Woodbrook Estates mobile home community in Lakeland was bustling. 

Kara Dethlefsen lined up early on a recent morning for the food pantry at the Camp Pendleton Marine Base near San Diego. She and her husband, both active-duty Marines, took turns holding their 4-month-old daughter.

"We most like to get the avocados, lemons, some vegetables to cook up," says Dethlefsen, 27, who first heard about the pantry from an on-base nurse after giving birth.

  It’s a problem that affects 700,000 people in the ten-county Tampa Bay area: food insecurity.

Thomas Mantz, the Executive Director of the group Feeding Tampa Bay says food insecurity is when people like you and me don’t have consistent access to food due to a lack of money or other resources. 

Pinellas County has nearly 150,000 people who sometimes don’t know where their next meal is coming from, according to the group Feeding America.

They are known as being food insecure.

Thousands of Summer Meals on the Way to Hungry Kids

Jun 7, 2016

Hundreds of people packed thousands of meals at Godby High School on Saturday (6/4). It was the fourth year for the "Full Summer" effort to feed hungry kids and their families over the summer months.

WFSU news is taking a look at hunger in the Big Bend this week. In the final installment of our series we’ll take a look at the impact food deserts have on a person’s ability access fresh fruits and vegetables and the potential impact of new legislation lawmakers hope will help.

For many students in Florida, summer vacation means finally getting out of the classroom and away from tests and homework.  But for some, the Summer also means figuring out where the next meal will come from. Now there are efforts underway to address hunger in North Florida—especially at times when a major food program—the school—is no longer in session. 

Nearly a quarter of Gadsden County residents don't know where their next meal is coming from. Leon County is close behind with 22 percent of residents classified as "food insecure". That's according a recent report from the group, Feeding America. The organization's study shows hunger is widespread in the Big Bend.

Safley Brings Focus On Child Hunger, Poverty To Food-Bank Post

Dec 23, 2015
LinkedIn

The new chief of Florida's food banks, Robin Safley, is a former top state agriculture official who has led efforts to bolster nutrition programs for schoolchildren.

An estimated 7.9 million kids in the U.S. live in "food-insecure" households. This means there's not always enough to eat at home.

But when these kids go to the doctor for a checkup, or a well-child visit, the signs of malnutrition are not always apparent. So pediatricians say it's time to start asking about it.

Florida Today

Congress' approach to cutting the budget -- automatic cuts called "sequestration" -- has affected the elderly where it really counts: food. 

The Orlando Sentinel reports that both meal delivery and congregate meals for seniors have been reduced.