climate change

Did you lose power for a week after Hurricane Irma? Are you frustrated with the king tide flooding on your street? Or maybe thoughts of climate change keep you up at night?

 

A Florida State University study links declining bumble bee populations with climate change.

The researchers examined three bumble bee species in the Colorado Rocky Mountains and found warmer temperatures are affecting flowers, the animals’ food source.

Lead investigator Jane Ogilvie considers the findings a warning for other places like Florida, where she says the issue is not as well-studied.

“There could be subtle changes in how flowers are distributed in a place like Florida that could have these knock-on effects on pollinators.”

In South Florida, climate change means higher seas, stronger storms and hotter summers. That could make the region unlivable within a couple hundred years. But scientists say if the world takes steps like reducing carbon emissions, we could buy ourselves some time.

A group of concerned citizens is trying to get that message out.

At Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Naples, the landscape is quintessential Florida. There's the marsh area with towering cypress trees and there's the wet prairie. 

It's what Florida looked like hundreds of years ago. And it's one of the places where people were tallying butterflies for the North American Butterfly Association's (NABA) summer count. 

St. Augustine Mayor Nancy Shaver addressed the U.S. Green Building Council Thursday in Jacksonville.


The claims are flying fast and furious around the proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. A version proposed by Republicans in the House of Representatives would replace it with the American Health Care Act.

South Floridians are seeing the impacts of climate change firsthand, in sunny-day flooding and record-breaking temperatures as recently as Memorial Day weekend.

That's why for many, President Trump's decision Thursday to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accords constituted a betrayal.

It costs a lot of money to keep Florida’s beaches “postcard ready.” How much sand is on your favorite beach? In some cases, not quite enough.


U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson just left an Arctic Council meeting in Anchorage without saying whether the U.S. will pull out of the Paris accords. Meanwhile, climate change activists say Florida should pay attention to the council's latest report.

Marches to raise awareness about the need to address climate change and rising sea levels will be held Saturday throughout the Tampa Bay area. It's part of a worldwide effort to urge action to curb greenhouse gases.

Mangroves are quintessentially tropical and take root along the coast of the Everglades and the Keys where they are home to colorful fish and crabs. But these plants are not marooned in South Florida anymore. WFSU went searching for mangroves along the state’s Gulf Coast.

Scientists from around the globe agree that the Earth’s climate is changing. The impact of that changing climate, how fast those impacts will be felt, and what residents in a coastal state like Florida can expect are more difficult to describe.

Even before President-elect Donald Trump named Rex Tillerson, Rick Perry and Scott Pruitt for coveted Cabinet posts, the men topped the environmental movement’s 10 most wanted list.

In the next 50 years, climate change researchers say sea levels could rise by five to six inches. Those inches pose a threat not only to homes and buildings, but to the natural barriers that have protected Florida's coasts throughout human history. A combination of a warming planet and rising seas could drive more severe storm surges that wipe out barriers islands and flood coastal areas. 

That's why researchers and planners in the Estero Bay region are taking steps now to build climate change resilience and adaptations into their plans, which are being shared at the Cela Tega conference series on the FGCU campus on Monday, Dec. 12.

New Research Shows Wide Scope Of Climate Change Impacts

Nov 16, 2016
Florida Climate Change Institute

New research out of the University of Florida shows climate change is affecting all aspects of life on Earth, from entire ecosystems to the genetics of individual animals.

Florida scientists are calling on President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change as not a hoax.

The scientists are calling for a meeting with the president-elect who in tweets has described climate change as a hoax created by China or something based on faulty science.

President-elect Donald Trump is on record as a climate change denier, and that’s bad news for the Sunshine State, experts say.

Peter Haden/WLRN

This has been one of those weeks in South Florida when there’s a lot of water in the streets, even when the sun’s out. It’s a King Tide week. Business people, scientists and local officials got together in a Fort Lauderdale conference room with the water rising outside the building to talk about the problem.

St. Petersburg is facing scrutiny over its recent decision to pump 20 million gallons of sewage from an overloaded treatment plant into Tampa Bay.

One national environmental organization is warning: similar overflows could become more common as the climate changes.


Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem. If you ask Michael McGeehin, climate change is a health crisis.

McGeehin is an epidemiologist who spent more than 30 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He developed the CDC’s Climate Change Program.

McGeehin was recently in Miami for an international epidemiology conference. And he spoke with Health News Florida about how public health is threatened by changing rain patterns, sea level rise and heat waves:

Allen Tilley, retired professor of the University of North Florida, believes government leaders aren’t doing enough long-term planning to prepare for the damages sea level rising can cause across the nation, but especially here in North Florida.

Marc Averette / Wikimedia Commons

 The Florida Department of Health is giving $10,000 grants for the study of “health effects related to weather events,” or in the words of many scientists: global warming, the Tampa Bay Times reports. 

AP

 

Five scientists who met with Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday are convinced that climate change is real, but what they are less sure about is whether the governor believes them.

The scientists had 30 minutes to make a presentation in Scott's office and the first seven minutes were taken up by small talk.

AP

On a recent afternoon, Scott McKenzie watched torrential rains and a murky tide swallow the street outside his dog-grooming salon. Within minutes, much of this stretch of chic South Beach was flooded ankle-deep in a fetid mix of rain and sea.

"Welcome to the new Venice," McKenzie

   joked as salt water surged from the sewers.

There are few places in the nation more vulnerable to rising sea levels than low-lying South Florida, a tourist and retirement mecca built on drained swampland.

Florida Current

Even though a repeal on the red-light camera law passed in committee 10-8, the closeness of the vote shows the bill may not last long, the Bradenton Herald reports. While some lawmakers say the cameras are just money-makers, others lawmakers and interest groups insist they save lives.