Tallahassee

Florida State University has investigated some 45 students for violating the school's COVID-19 safety rules. The university has come under scrutiny for the behavior of some students who've flouted safety protocols.

Bars throughout Florida are opening their doors this week for full service. In an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus, the state government had limited bars without a restaurant license to serving alcohol for off-premise drinking only. That rule has been repealed, but getting by in the meantime has been hard for a few Tallahassee establishments.

State officials sounded the foghorn Monday to let bars serve on-premise alcohol again, but for many Florida establishments, it wasn’t much of a change. Bars throughout Leon County have been using a workaround that allowed them to operate as restaurants.

After a state-wide shutdown, bars were allowed to reopen early in June, but that didn’t last long. State officials said too many people were gathering in large groups and weren’t following social distancing guidelines. They limited bars to serving alcohol only for off-premise consumption. Then officials made another change.

tallahassee aerial
Adobe

In the state's poorest ZIP code, 32304 in Tallahassee, low-income residents live side-by-side with college students. That's raising concerns since local coronavirus cases are rising among college-aged people, and low-income people tend to face more negative health impacts if infected.

Human service non-profits are becoming ever more creative as the pandemic continues. That includes the Alzheimer's Project, which serves patients and caregivers across the Big Bend.

On top of everything else, the organization has a new executive director. John Trombetta took over that post the first of June.

"This is such a great organization! I've been really lucky to come in behind Debbie Maroney who did such a great job over the last 5 years really promoting and raising our service level and awareness in the community."

Florida A&M Boosts Testing For Coronavirus

Jun 30, 2020
Leon.FloridaHealth.gov

Florida A&M University has gotten approval to ramp up testing at its COVID-19 testing site. This comes after several consecutive days of reaching maximum capacity.

Cars full of people waiting for a coronavirus test at the Patients First on Mahan Drive in Tallahassee stretched more than half-a-mile Monday, wrapping around the corner onto Magnolia Drive. One person waiting for a test reports staying in line for almost nine hours, despite arriving before the test site had officially opened. Some waiting vehicles ran out of fuel. Other drivers left their cars to pick up food from a nearby restaurant or even find spots for semi-hidden bathroom breaks.

The ZOOM platform isn't only for business meetings and class work. It's also being used to keep mental health support groups together. When the coronavirus put an end to in-person gatherings,

Tallahassee healthcare leaders agree a peak in COVID-19 cases could come within the next few weeks. But they warn, that’s only if residents continue the current social distancing practices in place now.

Tallahassee's city commission started considering whether it should ban conversion therapy toward the end of last year. The practice attempts to change someone's sexual orientation and gender identity.

Researchers at the University of Miami’s Gordon Center are unveiling a new protocol for active shooter situations. Tallahassee first responders are some of the first to receive this groundbreaking training.

The so-called “missing link” of the St. Marks Trail between Tallahassee and the Gulf coast has been finished.

Tallahassee police gave a brief update on the ongoing investigation following yoga studio shooting in Tallahassee this month. 

What was supposed to be a routine Friday night ritual of socializing, dining and exercising in an upscale shopping center a few miles from Florida's Capitol turned into a chaotic scene after a gunman shot two people to death and wounded five others at a yoga studio before killing himself.

Once upon a time, the Red Wolf roamed the south and eastern United States, from Texas to Pennsylvania. Today, there are fewer than 40 wolves left in the wild. The species is what’s called “functionally extinct”— with most of the remaining 200 or so wolves in captivity. The Trump administration is proposing changes to the Endangered Species Act that conservationists worry, could end what little protection the Red Wolf has left.

The “Big Pro Gun Rally” and the March for Our Lives rally both took place in downtown Tallahassee this weekend.

Have you ever wondered what the world actually looked like a billion years ago? A Capital City scientist has helped discover at least a partial answer to that question and that finding has made her an overnight media sensation worldwide.

WMFE

A divided appeals court Friday upheld a decision to deny workers’ compensation insurance benefits to a hospital housekeeper who tested positive for marijuana after falling on the job and dislocating her shoulder.

A Tallahassee residential community for the disabled is edging closer to reality. The latest fundraiser for the proposed “Independence Landing” at Southwood gave the project a significant boost.

There are many people talking about the need for more accessible mental health care. As part of that larger discussion, Mental Health Council of the Big Bend will present a very special kind of public health fair next Tuesday (May 29) in hopes of improving that accessibility.

Second Harvest of the Big Bend distributed about 20 tons of food at Tallahassee's Godby High School on Saturday (May 19.)

Humana.com

After scoring a big victory in a statewide Medicaid managed-care procurement, Humana and Jon Bussey, who served as its regional director of corporate affairs, have parted ways. 

April was National Minority Health Month and with diabetes and other health related issues increasing in communities around the state, researchers want to address health disparities. The Florida Department of Health focused its efforts on food deserts and pushed for healthy eating and education. Researchers are pointing to those same food deserts as a contributor to health issues disproportionally affecting minorities, and advocates say education and access to healthier foods would help these communities get back to basics. 

Patient in discussion with doctor at a desk.
Daylina Miller/WUSF

Florida’s Medicaid program has been rapped by auditors who questioned what the state got for millions of dollars spent with a company whose lobbyists included two former Republican House speakers and a former top health-care regulator.

News Service of Florida

Two days after instructing federal prosecutors to seek the death penalty in drug-related cases, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions came to Tallahassee on Thursday to promote President Donald Trump’s plan to combat the deadly opioid epidemic.

The new chief executive officer at Capital Regional Medical Center is no stranger to Tallahassee. Alan Keesee was second-in-command at the local hospital before doing the same job at a sister HCA facility in Las Vegas over the past couple of years.

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School aren't the only ones mobilizing for change after the mass shooting that left 17 students and faculty dead on the school grounds. 

 

The Capital City’s “seasoned citizens” were checking out the many community resources available to them on Friday, Oct. 13 at the Active Living Expo. The event at the city’s Senior Center featured about 80 exhibitors.

Tallahassee is getting a new medical marijuana dispensary.

The solo practice family doctor is becoming less and less common. But a local primary care group is surviving the test of time, and celebrating twenty years of service. WFSU sat down with some of the doctors there to find out how healthcare has changed in the past two decades.

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