insulin

Skyrocketing prices of insulin in recent years have increased medical costs for the millions of people living with diabetes around the country and in Florida. 

Florida Lawmakers Look To Hold Down Insulin Costs

Sep 19, 2019
Eight bottles of Insulin on a table.
Alan Levine / Flickr

Two state lawmakers don’t want insured diabetics to pay more than $100 a month in out-of-pocket costs for insulin. 

Angela Lautner knew her thirst was unusual, even for someone directing airplanes, outside in the Memphis summer heat.

"We had coolers of Gatorade and water for people to always have access to," Lautner remembers of her job as a ground services agent. "But the amount of thirst that I felt was just incredible."

She had no appetite and she lost an unusual amount of weight. Then after a trip to the emergency room, Lautner, who was 22, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. The diagnosis was life changing.

Flickr Creative Commons

Changing the cannulas or tubes in the insulin pumps is not only painful for patients, but increases their risk of infection. 

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly.

High Cost Of Diabetes Drugs Often Goes Overlooked

Aug 18, 2015

When it comes to treating chronic conditions, diabetes drugs aren't nearly as sexy as say, Sovaldi, last year's breakthrough hepatitis C drug that offers a cure for the chronic liver infection at a price approaching six figures.

Yet an estimated 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes — about 10 times the number of people with hepatitis C — and many of them will take diabetes drugs for the rest of their lives. Cost increases for both old and new drugs are forcing many to scramble to pay for them.

Editors' note: The study this story covers have retracted their work, saying that they made errors in conducting the experiment that invalidate the results. The study prompted controversy when it was published in 2013, and study author Douglas Melton collaborated with some of those critics to figure out where it went wrong.

AP Photo

The FDA has approved a new drug that would treat Type 2 diabetes in a different way, by flushing insulin out of the body in urine, the New York Times reports.