Jenny Staletovich

Jenny Staletovich has been a journalist working in Florida for nearly 20 years.

She’s reported on some of the region’s major environment stories, including the 2018 devastating red tide and blue-green algae blooms, impacts from climate change and Everglades restoration, the nation’s largest water restoration project. She’s also written about disappearing rare forests, invasive pythons, diseased coral and a host of other critical issues around the state.

She covered the environment, climate change and hurricanes for the Miami Herald for five years and previously freelanced for the paper. She worked at the Palm Beach Post from 1989 to 2000, covering crime, government and general assignment stories.

She has won several state and national awards including the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment, the Green Eyeshades and the Sunshine State Awards.

Staletovich graduated from Smith College and lives in Miami, with her husband and their three children.

The day of her 38th birthday in April, Jane Castro decided it was time to finally find out if she’d contracted COVID-19 during a January trip to Arizona State University.

Florida business regulators shut down a web portal launched to make it easier for the public to file complaints about businesses that violate COVID-19 guidelines last month, just as cases statewide started to surge.

The Department of Business and Professional Regulation created the online form in mid March, but removed it May 29.

As South Florida swings into its third week of reopening amid the COVID-19 outbreak and testing expands, the virus is showing signs of increasing.

In its first account of statewide antibody testing, the Florida Department of Health reported Friday that about 4.4 percent of more than 123,000 tested came back positive for signs of an infection, providing a snapshot of how the disease might be spreading.

But the report warns that the accuracy of commercial lab results included in the mix is not known and experts say even results from approved tests could have a high degree of inaccuracy.

As he toured the state earlier this month to promote his plans to reopen Florida, Gov. Ron DeSantis repeatedly touted testing for COVID-19 antibodies as a signal that immunity may be lurking, undetected, among the population.

Updated May 7 at 12:30 p.m.

As the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gathers public input on how to operate Lake Okeechobee once it finishes $1.8 billion in repairs to its aging dike, an old fight has resurfaced: how high to keep water levels.

It’s a question that has long dogged the naturally shallow lake deepened after flood control and now a source of water for South Florida.

Miami-Dade County opened its shuttered boat marinas Wednesday for the first time in more than five weeks, drawing boaters in masks eager for an outing on the water — even on a work day.

Two popular marinas at Crandon Park on Key Biscayne and Matheson Hammock in Coral Gables saw steady traffic, but not nearly the crush they expect to see this weekend.

Florida Democrats want federal auditors to investigate the state’s flawed unemployment system and a backlog they say ranks among the worst in the country.

A month after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said a Texas company searching for oil damaged wetlands in the Big Cypress National Preserve, the agency reversed the decision Friday.

Early indications from a University of Miami survey to measure the true infection rate of the new coronavirus across Miami-Dade County suggest a higher infection rate than detected by state health officials.

On a balmy evening this past February, before the darkest days of the COVID-19 pandemic arrived in South Florida, Capt. Bouncer Smith motored his 33-foot open fisherman into Government Cut. The Miami skyline glowed like a string of lanterns. On board, a group of return customers in town for the annual boat show were stalking tarpon.

Miami-Dade County and the University of Miami on Friday launched what they say is the largest community study yet to detect the spread and infection rate of the COVID-19 coronavirus.

In the wake of the coronavirus, Florida’s troubled unemployment office has been crippled by a barrage of applications that topped 317,000 applications in just the last 10 days.

Those problems did not come without warnings.

With workers and businesses around the planet suddenly shut down, scientists are getting an unexpected glimpse at a world with less carbon.

Labor unions are calling on Governor Ron DeSantis to fix Florida’s unemployment system before a wave of joblessness hits the state.

In a telephone press conference on Thursday, the AFL-CIO, Service Employees International Union and Unite Here, which combined represent more than a million workers and their families in Florida, say the cumbersome system has been crashing as workers race to apply for benefits. The state’s unemployment office received about 200,000 inquiries just last week.

As businesses shut indefinitely to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, thousands of workers around South Florida are facing an uncertain future.

South Florida ramped up testing and treatment measures Sunday as the number of COVID-19 coronavirus cases continues to rise, accounting for half the state’s infections.

When Marlins Park opened in 2012, a neomodern shrine to baseball rising in Miami’s Little Havana, Duane Thwaites figured he’d found his dream job.

The Brooklyn native moved to Miami nearly 30 years ago, raised his four kids, got hired for opening day and returned every season, climbing the ladder to supervise a concession.

“It's just hard to explain why I like the job and I stick with it, but it's, you know, I feel it's like my passion,” said Thwaites, 51.

All of Miami-Dade County is closing restaurants, bars, movie theaters and other places that draw crowds in the wake of the COVID-19 coronavirus.

In South Florida, a normal emergency looks like a column of swirling wind. Hurricanes are our definition of disaster preparation.

But the COVID-19 coronavirus is redefining what an emergency means, and interrupting life is ways many of us couldn’t imagine just a few weeks ago. 

Residents of Miami Beach, Surfside and Bal Harbour Village are being warned to steer clear of some waterways and reduce water use after three sewer line breaks this week.

Port Everglades and local elected officials marked the first step in a $437 million expansion to make way for expected massive new cargo ships with a celebratory press conference on Tuesday.

“It’s a critical milestone in getting there,” acting port director Glenn Wiltshire said afterwards of the $29 million Congress approved this month to move a Coast Guard station blocking work.

Scientists investigating a devastating new coral disease infecting reefs from Florida to and throughout the Caribbean may be zeroing in on a culprit behind the unpredictable spread: ballast water from big ships.

Investigators are now poring over shipping records housed at the Smithsonian to confirm the connection and better contain it.

Florida’s woeful water conditions may be driving manatees into new, more hazardous territory.

In 2019, the number of manatees killed by boats reached a new high. Of the 574 deaths recorded as of Dec. 20, 130 were caused by collisions with boats, marking the third year in a row that fatal boat strikes increased.

New sea level rise projections for South Florida show an alarming trend: higher waters are coming faster than previously expected.

According to the Southeast Florida Climate Compact, seas could rise between one foot and two-and-a-half feet by 2060 – two to five inches more than 2015 projections.

A lethal Gulf Coast red tide that littered beaches with dead wildlife in 2018 is back and this time around, it's claiming one of North America's rarest bird species.

A stand-off between Florida’s Indian tribes and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is threatening to derail work to restore more than a half million acres of swamps and marshes.

If the past is any indication, worsening threats from climate change, like rising seas in South Florida, could take a larger toll on the poor as people are forced to abandon their homes.

Scientists on Florida’s blue green algae task force began the daunting task this week of trying to craft recommendations for how to fix the state’s complex water problems.

A doctored hurricane map President Donald Trump presented inside the Oval Office to bolster his claim about storm threats to Alabama — less than a day after Dorian flattened the Northern Bahamas and left at least 50 dead — continues to send ripples through the weather community this week.

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