Affordable Care Act

healthcare.gov

For people who want their insurance to kick in January 1st, enrollment has been extended through Monday Dec. 19.

With that said, the big question for those who get their health insurance thanks to the Affordable Care Act is, what will happen to the ACA once President Elect Donald Trump takes office Jan. 20?

The deadline to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is Thursday, Dec 15. To date, 1.6 million Floridians have coverage under marketplace plans, but that doesn't mean Florida's healthcare marketplace is without problems: major health insurance companies have left the state's marketplace, insurance buyers have endured fluctuating premium prices, and the program faces an incoming president who has vowed to "repeal Obamacare." Questions about insurance bought under the ACA abound.

Scott To Discuss Obamacare With New HHS Chief

Dec 14, 2016
Valencia College / Flickr

After promising to help President-elect Donald Trump rewrite the Affordable Care Act, Florida Gov. Rick Scott met Tuesday afternoon with the incoming secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell visited Tampa on Tuesday to remind Floridians they’re in the final days to enroll in the federal marketplace for health insurance.

Since Republicans have plans to repeal the federal health law, should consumers still sign up for next year's coverage? And if the health law marketplaces disappear, might Medicare eligibility be expanded? Here are answers to some recent questions from readers.

It sounds like Republicans plan to repeal the health law in January once Donald Trump is sworn in. Since open enrollment goes until the end of January, should I just wait and see what happens before signing up?

Republicans in Congress say they'll vote to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act early next year — even though they don't yet have a plan to replace it.

But they also insist that they don't want to harm any of the millions of people who got their health insurance under the law.

Image courtesy of Everydayplus at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Look closely at a bill from your health care provider, and there's likely a sigh of relief your insurance company negotiated a better rate than the initial charge.

But those negotiations are often secret, and it's hard to compare one insurance company to another.

So how do you know whether they are negotiating the best price?

Healthcare.gov

Repealing President Barack Obama's health care law without a clear replacement risks making nearly 30 million people uninsured, according to a study released Wednesday.

It’s an unusual season for shopping for health insurance.

Dec.15 is still the deadline to buy an Affordable Care Act plan that begins Jan. 1 through the healthcare.gov website.

 

Obama: U.S. ‘Can’t Go Backward’ On Health Care Act

Dec 5, 2016
Lynn Hatter/WFSU / WFSU

President Barack Obama is urging the public to help save his health care law, which is in serious danger of being repealed under President-elect Donald Trump.

Kaiser Health News

As the only insurer to offer plans in the Affordable Care Act marketplace in all of Florida's 67 counties, Florida Blue is keeping a close eye on proposed changes from Donald Trump's administration.

Joint replacements. Cardiac care. Chemotherapy.

What do those things have to do with the repeal of the Affordable Care Act?

Well, an often overlooked part of Obamacare is a test kitchen within the Department of Health and Human Services that experiments with new ways for the government to pay for some expensive and frequently used health care services, including those three.

Rep. Tom Price, a Georgia Republican, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services. He is currently chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee.

Price, an orthopedic surgeon for nearly 20 years before coming to Congress, has represented the northern Atlanta suburbs in the House of Representatives since 2005.

Lynn Hatter/WFSU / WFSU

Sherry Riggs didn't stay awake to find out who the next president would be. Her heart literally couldn't take it.

Riggs, a 55-year-old barber, has been ordered to avoid stress after a heart attack and bypass surgery last month. Last year, she had a stent put in, paid for by insurance she purchased under President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

President-elect Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan agree that repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with some other health insurance system is a top priority.

But they disagree on whether overhauling Medicare should be part of that plan. Medicare is the government-run health system for people age 65 and older and the disabled.

Trump said little about Medicare during his campaign, other than to promise that he wouldn't cut it.

Ryan, on the other hand, has Medicare in his sights.

This month's election results could have big implications for those who now have insurance because of the Affordable Care Act — either through the exchanges or Medicaid expansion. President-elect Trump and Republicans in Congress have made it clear they want to scrap the law, but it's unclear what may replace it. That gap between repeal and replacement has left many unsure of what will happen with their medical care. We have these reports from around the country from people who could be affected by changes.

Little Lula's Preexisting Condition Is Cancer

Florida House of Representatives

Florida’s most vocal advocacy group on health issues will lay off all five of its employees next month as an indirect result of the Republican sweep in the Nov. 8 election.

healthcare.gov

The Republican-led House of Representatives is asking the federal appeals court in Washington to delay consideration of a case involving the Obama health care law because Donald Trump has pledged to repeal and replace it when he becomes president.

Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress are vowing to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the signature health care overhaul of President Obama.

Trump has offered a few ideas of where he'd like to see a health care overhaul go, such as a greater reliance on health savings accounts, but he hasn't provided a detailed proposal.

healthcare.gov

On the day after the election, 100,000 people enrolled in the Affordable Care Act. It was the largest single-day enrollment period up to that point.

Some Panic, Others Unfazed Over Losing Obamacare

Nov 15, 2016
Denise Gascoigne

The 20 million Americans who have gained health coverage under the Affordable Care Act don’t yet know exactly how the presidency of Donald Trump will change their lives — and reactions to that uncertainty range from anxiety to apathy.

Obamacare ‘Replacement’ Might Look Familiar

Nov 13, 2016
Jim Watson / AFP/Getty Images

The Affordable Care Act transformed the medical system, expanding coverage to millions, injecting billions in tax revenue, changing insurance rules and launching ambitious experiments in quality and efficiency.

Republicans have been vowing for six years now to repeal the Affordable Care Act. They have voted to do so dozens of times, despite knowing any measures would be vetoed by President Obama.

But the election of Donald Trump as president means Republican lawmakers wouldn't even have to pass repeal legislation to stop the health law from functioning. Instead, President Trump could do much of it with a stroke of a pen.

President-elect Donald Trump has promised over and over in recent months that he will repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, when he reaches the White House.

"Obamacare is a disaster. You know it. We all know it," Trump said at a debate last month. "We have to repeal it and replace it with something absolutely much less expensive."

Cheap Health Insurance / Flickr

One prediction of the Affordable Care Act was that health care prices would drop when more people became insured. The idea was that providers would no longer shoulder the costs of caring for the uninsured.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: I think most people hate to think of themselves as middle class.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: You have what you need but maybe not everything you want.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: We have a car, but we live in an apartment. That's middle class.

Healthy Customers, And Those With Major Medical Needs, May Want Bronze Plans

Nov 2, 2016
www.healthcare.gov

The open enrollment period for coverage through the health insurance marketplaces started Tuesday, and readers have plenty of questions about what to buy. I addressed a few of them this week.

Open enrollment is underway for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act exchanges. 

healthcare.gov

Open enrollment in the Affordable Care Act Marketplaces begins Tuesday and the state says the average premium increase in Florida is 19 percent.

But the news is not be as bad as it sounds for most consumers.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is blasting double-digit increases in Obamacare premiums just as the administration gears up for the Nov. 1st start of open enrollment.

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