weight

Promising workers lower health insurance premiums for losing weight did nothing to help them take off the pounds, a recent study found. At the end of a year, obese workers had lost less than 1.5 pounds on average, statistically no different than the minute average gain of a tenth of a pound for workers who weren't offered a financial incentive to lose weight.

Associated Press

Florida has the 37th highest obesity rate among adults, up from its last ranking of 40th, according to a report from Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  

Florida's increase from 25.2 percent in 2012 to 26.4 percent in 2013 is not statistically significant, according to the annual report that's now named “The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America." For the past decade, it was called the "F as in FAT" report.

On one level, it's easy to understand the allure of a fad diet: Eat this, not that and you'll lose weight, guaranteed. Who doesn't want an easy way to shed unwanted pounds?

Pregnant? It's OK To Have A Glass Of Wine*

Aug 20, 2013

*According to an economist.

In her new book Expecting Better, economist and new mom Emily Oster parses the evidence behind all the recommendations given to pregnant women. She argues that, as an economist, she's trained to both examine evidence and think about trade-offs.

According to the latest "F as in Fat" report from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Florida still has a serious obesity problem. 

Although the rate decreased slightly from 26.6 percent in 2011 to 25.2 percent in 2012, researchers say the lower numbers aren't statistically significant. They call the changes a "leveling off," not a decrease.

Across the country, every state except for Arkansas had a slightly lower adult obesity rate. Researchers caution there's still a long way to go, and note people who are obese are at risk for much worse health outcomes and higher health costs. 

"The numbers were essentially flat from last year," said Jeff Levi, executive director of the Trust for America's Health. "That's the first time  in the 10 years we've been doing this report, and in the many years the CDC has been following theses trends, that we've seen that kind of leveling off, so that's a very hopeful sign."

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

Jul 26, 2013

Don't try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good. Florida researchers have evidence that discriminating against fat people only makes them fatter.

The decision by the Boy Scouts to not let scouts participate in its National Jamboree if they have a BMI higher than 40 is disgraceful, according to a column in the Broward Palm Beach New Times. The Obesity Action Coalition is urging the Boy Scouts of America to let all scouts go to the jamboree, regardless of their size. 

Mike Powell / Getty Images

It’s much too soon to get excited -- it’s still in the mouse stage of research -- but a substance being tested by Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter and other centers seems to make obese rodents lose weight and use 5 percent more energy. All without exercise. As the New York Times describes, there are too many unanswered questions at this point to know whether such a substance might do more harm than good.

A multi-year study finds that Americans -- and Floridians -- are exercising more than in the past, yet still getting fatter. In a similar vein, we're living longer, but the extra years aren't healthy ones.

Those seemingly contradictory results, which show public health is a complicated business, emerge from a sweeping 25-year study of the nation's health published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The analysis was done by Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Obesity Is A 'Disease.' Now What?

Jun 21, 2013

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CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Obesity has long been recognized as a public health problem. But this week, the American Medical Association, the nation's largest professional organization of physicians, has taken the step of officially recognizing obesity as a disease.

Sleep Less, Eat More, Gain Weight

Mar 11, 2013

Tired? Surely those cookies will help. And a burger. Chips. And a cupcake. Yeah, soda, too.

People do eat more when they're short of sleep. And that impulse to snarf when sleepy can cause quick weight gain, according to a new study.

Since Americans are chronically sleep deprived, it's no wonder that our waistlines have been expanding. One-third of American workers say they're sleeping six or fewer hours a night, compared with the seven to nine hours recommended.