U.S. Supreme Court

Florida prison
Associated Press

The lives of nearly 400 death row inmates hang in the balance during oral arguments Thursday before Florida's Supreme Court, which will ultimately decide if their sentences should be reduced to life in prison.

Florida's highest court on Tuesday will hear a case that may determine the fate of some 390 people on the state's death row. Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Florida's system for imposing the death penalty is unconstitutional.

Florida has an execution set for next week. The state's highest court now must decide whether it can go forward.

Bill Would Require Stricter Standards For Abortion Clinics

Jan 20, 2016
Florida House of Representatives

Abortion clinics would have to meet strict new licensing requirements under a bill being considered by the Florida Legislature.

Top FL Court Schedules Death Penalty Arguments

Jan 19, 2016
Florida Supreme Court
Flickr

The Florida Supreme Court has refused to grant a stay in an execution scheduled for next month, but ordered oral arguments to hear about the potential impact of a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision last week striking down the state's death penalty sentencing structure.

Lawyers for Cary Michael Lambrix, a convicted murderer who has been on Death Row for more than three decades, had asked the court to indefinitely postpone the execution, scheduled for Feb. 11, after the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling last Tuesday in a case known as Hurst v. Florida.

The U.S. Supreme Court struck down Florida's death sentencing system as unconstitutional on Tuesday, casting doubt on the status of all the state's death sentences.

Florida ranks second in the nation in the number of death row inmates, with 390 men and women currently awaiting execution.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

FL Tops U.S. For Health Subsidies

Jun 3, 2015

More than 10 million people have signed up for private health insurance this year under the federal health law, the administration said Tuesday. That puts the nation finally within reach of coverage for all, but it may not last.

The report from the Department of Health and Human Services comes as dozens of insurers are proposing double-digit premium hikes for next year, raising concerns about future affordability. And the Supreme Court is weighing the legality of subsidized premiums for millions of consumers in more than 30 states. A decision is due around the end of the month.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a state regulatory board made up mostly of dentists violated federal law against unfair competition when it tried to prevent lower-cost competitors in other fields from offering teeth-whitening services. 

By a 6-3 vote, the justices rejected arguments from the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners that it was acting in the best interests of consumers when it pressured nondentists to get out of the lucrative trade in teeth-whitening services.

High Court Considers If Providers Can Sue States For Higher Medicaid Pay

Jan 21, 2015

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case that could block hospitals, doctors — or anyone else — from suing states over inadequate payment rates for providers who participate in the Medicaid program for low-income Americans.

Federal law requires Medicaid, which covers 70 million people, to provide the same access to care as that given to people with private insurance. But many doctors avoid seeing Medicaid recipients, saying the program pays too little. That can lead to delays and difficulties in getting care for millions of poor people.

FL Lawyer: Pregnancy Case a Tough Call

Dec 4, 2014
Hollified Legal Centre

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case that could affect how pregnant workers are treated on the job.

Peggy Young was denied a request to go on ‘light duty’ by her employer- UPS. Instead, she was put on unpaid leave and had her health insurance suspended. The supreme court will decide if an employer who accommodates the medical needs of non-pregnant workers must do the same with pregnant workers. A ruling isn’t expected until this Spring.

Winter Park Attorney Travis Hollifield won a similar case before the Florida Supreme Court.

Once again the Supreme Court will decide whether the Affordable Care Act lives or dies.

Defying expectations, the court announced Friday it has agreed to hear a case that challenges the heart of the law: subsidies that help people pay their insurance premiums. In about three dozen states, the federal government runs the online marketplaces (exchanges) where individuals can find health plans.

Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Florida's lawsuit seeking to limit the amount of water its neighbor Georgia can take from a shared river system.

The court's decision Monday to hear the case was applauded by Florida officials, and marked a new chapter in the decades-long regional battle over rights to take water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint river system.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 12 years ago that the states could not execute the "mentally retarded." But the court left to the states the definition of what constitutes retardation.

On Tuesday, however, the justices, by a 5-to-4 vote, imposed some limits on those definitions. At issue, in a case from Florida, was how to evaluate IQ tests.

The U.S. Supreme Court will meet privately on Friday to decide  whether it will hear an appeal filed by Gov. Rick Scott on state employee drug testing, the News Service of Florida reports. Scott filed the appeal in January after a lower court threw  out  his executive order that all state employees undergo random urine screens. Opponents of the order say that it violates the Fourth Amendment’s ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. The 11th U.S.

Florida is one of a handful of states supporting the National Rifle Association’s challenge of a federal law that restricts young adults from buying guns, according to the Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau.   Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, along with 22 other attorneys general, said she will sign onto the brief.  Currently, federal law restricts people between the ages of 18 and 21 from purchasing guns.

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