U.S. Supreme Court

The fate of the Affordable Care Act is again on the line Tuesday, as a federal appeals court in New Orleans takes up a case in which a lower court judge has already ruled the massive health law unconstitutional.

Architect of the Capitol

The Supreme Court on Monday avoided a high-profile case by rejecting appeals from Kansas and Louisiana in their effort to strip Medicaid money from Planned Parenthood, over the dissenting votes of three justices.

Executive Office of the President of the United States (public domain)

Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday in a frank and personal letter that she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease."

Wikimedia Commons

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday said he views Roe v. Wade as settled law, according to Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, but the answer did little to mollify Democrats who say he would restrict abortion access from the bench.

Medicaid home care aides — hourly workers who help elderly and disabled people with daily tasks like eating, getting dressed and bathing — are emerging as the latest target in the ongoing power struggle between some conservative lawmakers and organized labor.

U.S. Sen. Todd Young's Office

The heated debate over how Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would vote on the Affordable Care Act might not matter. As long as five past defenders of the health care law remain on the nation's highest court, the odds tilt in favor of it being allowed to stand.

Progressive and civil rights organizations are speaking out against the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Reproductive rights advocacy group Planned Parenthood is the latest to do so.

Architect of the Capitol

The Supreme Court on Tuesday effectively put an end to a California law that forces anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to provide information about abortion.

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Updated on March 21 at 7:35 p.m. ET

Supreme Court justices on both sides of the ideological spectrum expressed skepticism Tuesday about California's "truth-in-advertising" law requiring anti-abortion clinics to more fully disclose what they are.

The anti-abortion "crisis pregnancy centers" objected to the law on free-speech grounds.

While some more liberal justices appeared receptive to the state's case initially, doubt about the law seemed to increase as the argument progressed.

Architect of the Capitol

The Supreme Court on Monday appeared to be looking for a way to side with Florida in its complaint that Georgia uses too much water and leaves too little for its southern neighbor.

Supreme Court Rejects Challenge To Open-Carry Ban

Nov 28, 2017
Architect of the Capitol

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to take up a challenge to a Florida law that bars people from openly carrying firearms in public, ending a case that started nearly six years ago when a man was arrested in St. Lucie County.

Medical Records Fight Draws Attention At High Court

Sep 22, 2017
Barry Gutierrez/NPR

In a legal battle drawing attention from medical groups across the country, the U.S. Supreme Court could be close to deciding whether to hear a Florida case about the disclosure of medical records.

Challenge To Open-Carry Law Goes To U.S. Supreme Court

Jul 11, 2017
Architect of the Capitol

Attorneys for a man arrested in 2012 in St. Lucie County asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to take up a challenge to the constitutionality of a Florida law that bars people from openly carrying firearms in public.

Arguing that a Florida Supreme Court ruling “undermines” a federal patient-safety law, a Jacksonville hospital system is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a legal battle about the disclosure of medical records.


Justices To Consider ‘Water War’ Report

Mar 5, 2017
Beatrice Murch / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court will take the next step March 17 in Florida's lawsuit against Georgia over water use in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system.

U.S. Supreme Court Rejects Workers’ Comp Case

Nov 1, 2016
Stethoscope and gavel against a white backdrop.
Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up a case that raised questions about the constitutionality of Florida's workers' compensation insurance system.

Florida Death Penalty Still On Hold As Courts Seek Answers

Sep 29, 2016
Hello World Media / Flickr

Florida’s death penalty has been in a state of limbo this year.

The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday overturned a death sentence for an intellectually disabled murderer, following a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case.

Delegates at the Republican convention in Cleveland have approved the strongest anti-abortion platform in the party's history. But groups that oppose abortion — groups that lobbied for the strong language — are far from unified.

In fact, following last month's Supreme Court decision reaffirming a woman's right to abortion, leaders of a movement known for speaking largely with one voice are showing some surprising disagreement.

Another Judge Rules Death Penalty Law Unconstitutional

Jun 13, 2016
Florida Department of Corrections

For the second time in a month, a circuit judge has ruled that Florida's new death-penalty sentencing law is "patently unconstitutional" because it does not require unanimous jury decisions for death to be imposed.

Florida Supreme Court Justices Try To Sort Out Death Penalty Law

Jun 8, 2016
Florida Department of Corrections

The Florida Supreme Court on Tuesday heard arguments in a case focused on whether the state's new death penalty law is constitutional, and, if so, whether it applies to cases already in the pipeline when the law passed in March.

Supreme Court Ready To Hear Medical Malpractice, Other Major Cases

May 26, 2016
Stethoscope and gavel against a white backdrop.
Wikimedia Commons

For legal junkies, the Florida Supreme Court will be the best show in town during a three-day period in June.

Justices are poised to hear arguments on a series of high-profile issues, including gambling, the death penalty, guns and medical malpractice, according to a schedule released Wednesday.

Death Row Inmate Asks Court To Ignore Lawyer’s Requests

May 23, 2016
Florida Department of Corrections

A Death Row inmate whose execution is on hold has asked the Florida Supreme Court to abandon in his case consideration of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down the state's death-penalty sentencing process.

The Florida Supreme Court earlier this year indefinitely postponed the execution of Mark James Asay, a convicted double murderer who was scheduled to be put to death on March 17. The ruling was prompted by a U.S. Supreme Court decision that found Florida's death penalty sentencing system gave too much power to judges, and not juries.

Florida’s death penalty law and the fate of the state’s nearly 400 death row inmates remains in flux.  Last week a Miami-Dade judge ruled that Florida’s newly revised death penalty sentencing law is unconstitutional.  That ruling came in the case of Karon Gaiter who awaits trial for first-degree murder.  Judge Milton Hirsh ruled that the law goes against the long-time sanctity of unanimous verdicts in death penalty cases because the system only requires 10 of 12 jurors to vote in favor of imposing execution.

Defense Lawyers Question Death Penalty Jury Instructions

May 18, 2016
Stethoscope and gavel against a white backdrop.
Wikimedia Commons

Defense lawyers are attacking a new law aimed at fixing Florida's death penalty sentencing structure, which was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year because it gave too much power to judges instead of juries.

The U.S. Supreme Court is charting a middle course on the issue of contraceptive coverage for employees of religious non-profits. 

Florida’s highest court is weighing a decision that will likely impact all 390 men and women on the state’s death row.  Two men in very different places are hoping to see the same thing happen. 

Florida prison
Associated Press

The lives of nearly 400 death row inmates hang in the balance during oral arguments Thursday before Florida's Supreme Court, which will ultimately decide if their sentences should be reduced to life in prison.

Florida's highest court on Tuesday will hear a case that may determine the fate of some 390 people on the state's death row. Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Florida's system for imposing the death penalty is unconstitutional.

Florida has an execution set for next week. The state's highest court now must decide whether it can go forward.

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