toxic algae

Scientists say toxic red tide is back in the waters off the Florida southwest coast after fading away earlier this year following a 15-month bloom.

CDC Considers Health Impact of Toxic Algae In Okeechobee

Sep 30, 2019
Image courtesy of NASA

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is considering initiating a study into the health effects of high exposure to toxic algae on Lake Okeechobee. 

New federal limits for dangerous toxins linked to blue green algae in water where people swim, boat and fish could help Florida fight the dangerous blooms.

The recommended criteria is the first ever set by the Environmental Protection Agency for two common toxins found in algae caused by cyanobacteria and would need to be adopted by Florida. But environmentalists say there's a problem: the limits are double what was originally proposed in 2016.

Senate Moves Forward With Red Tide Research

Apr 10, 2019
Dead fish on the shore of a beach.
Stephen Splane / WUSF Public Media

A Senate panel moved forward Tuesday with a proposal that would direct $3 million a year to a red-tide research initiative between the state and Sarasota-based Mote Marine Laboratory, despite arguments that the proposal fails to fully address human involvement in the spread of the toxic algae. 

Amy Green/WMFE

Florida water managers are bracing for a potential water shortage months after massive releases from Lake Okeechobee triggered widespread toxic algae.

New Federal Funding To Help With Toxic Algae

Jan 9, 2019
Amy Green/WMFE

President Donald Trump has signed into law a bill expanding funding in response to toxic algae.

WMFE

Throughout the summer, politicians heard from Floridians angered by the latest bouts of toxic blue-green algae in the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers, along with a festering red-tide outbreak on the Gulf Coast.

Pinellas County is publishing regular respiratory forecasts for its beaches online, as toxic red tide blooms still linger.

Trump Signs Off On Major Reservoir Project

Oct 24, 2018
NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY

Construction of a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee that state lawmakers envision as a way to help a region beset by toxic algae blooms was part of a wide-ranging water bill signed Tuesday by President Donald Trump.

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Florida has money and resources ready as red tide that has lingered along the Gulf Coast has been detected in Palm Beach County’s coastal waters, Gov. Rick Scott’s office said Tuesday. 

As the impacts of red tide have consumed headlines, the economic and environmental angles have been covered at length.  But at ground zero for the toxic algae bloom, the emotional impact is palpable. 

Dead fish on the shore of a beach.
Stephen Splane / WUSF Public Media

Florida wildlife officials have decided to change fishing rules for snook and redfish through 2019 due to widespread toxic red tide algae in the Gulf of Mexico.

State wildlife officials reported this past Friday that elevated levels of the organism Karenia brevis are persisting along Florida's gulf coast, which is creating toxic red tide algae blooms from Pinellas County down to Collier County.

Florida this week declared a state of emergency because of a slow-moving natural disaster — red tide.

Red tide is toxic algae that have persisted off Florida's Gulf Coast for nearly a year. In recent weeks, the algae bloom has worsened, killing fish, turtles and dolphins and discouraging tourism on some of the state's most beautiful beaches.

WMFE

Political broadsides continue over who is to blame for ongoing water-quality problems across South Florida, as Gov. Rick Scott on Friday ordered more action to address red tide in coastal communities. 

WMFE

Toxic algae again is blooming in Florida waterways.

The algae began in Lake Okeechobee and is spreading after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers initiated flows to the adjoining Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers.

On the heels of a toxic algae bloom spreading across South Florida, Bay County health officials are reminding residents and visitors to be careful in area waters through a health campaign.

NASA

Gov. Rick Scott on Monday issued an emergency order over the reemergence of toxic algae outbreaks on both coasts, as the regions’ water quality blossoms into a political issue.

South Florida’s lakes and rivers aren’t the only waterways in the state experiencing toxic algal blooms.

They sound like environmental superheroes.

"These teams are the planet's best hope to solve this problem," said Eric Eikenberg, CEO of the Everglades Foundation, describing finalists in the foundation's $10 million competition for technology to remove phosphorus from water.

WQCS

Legislation making its way on Capitol Hill could help Florida communities hit by toxic algae blooms.