Lyme disease

Recent data shows a dramatic rise of confirmed cases of Lyme disease across the United States, including Florida.

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Tick-borne illnesses have more than doubled in the United States over the past decade. 

Tick-borne Lyme disease, which can cause life-threatening illness, remains a concern in Florida.

Last summer Felicia Keesing returned from a long trip and found that her home in upstate New York had been subjected to an invasion.

Scientists have tried all sorts of strategies for stopping the blacklegged tick, the carrier of Lyme disease, from biting us.

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that affects an estimated 300,000 people in the United States each year, primarily in the Northeast and upper Midwest.

Lyme disease has been called the great imitator because its symptoms can look like anything from multiple sclerosis and lupus to Alzheimer’s disease or autism. And the U.S. will see more than 300,000 new cases of tick-transmitted disease this year.

Until very recently it was thought that just one bacterium was to blame for causing Lyme disease in humans. But it turns out that a second, related bug can cause it too.

In 2013, during routine testing of bacterial DNA floating around in the blood samples of people suspected of having Lyme disease, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., realized they were looking at something different.