2020 Election

No door-to-door canvassing. Public gatherings are canceled. Motor vehicle offices are closed. Naturalization ceremonies are on hiatus.

Almost every place where Americans usually register to vote has been out of reach since March and it's led to a big drop in new registrations right before a presidential election that was expected to see record turnout.

Before the coronavirus crisis decimated the U.S. economy, the record-low unemployment rate for African Americans was the backbone of President Trump's reelection pitch to black voters.

It was always a tough sell, given his past performance with African Americans. Now it's even tougher after the pandemic has erased economic gains and forced the campaign to adjust its message in its outreach to black voters.

sign that says voter parking.
Daylina Miller/WUSF Public Media

Two people who worked at separate precincts in Broward County during last week’s primary election have tested positive for the coronavirus, local election officials said Thursday.

Excitement over Florida's presidential primary is waning, thanks to earlier voting contests in other states and the growing concerns over coronavirus.

With cases of COVID-19 appearing in Florida, polling places are looking to take extra measures to protect voters during the primary elections.

Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections Craig Latimer said that hand sanitizer stations and sanitizing wipes will be available to the public and workers at polling stations.

Voters across the country say health care is one of their top issues going into this year's election.

It ranks as the top issue for Democrats and independents and just below the economy for Republicans, polling from the Kaiser Family Foundation has found.

Congressional Candidates Go Head-To-Head On Health Care — Again

Feb 24, 2020

The California Democrats who fought to flip Republican congressional seats in 2018 used health care as their crowbar. The Republicans had just voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act in the U.S. House — and Democrats didn’t let voters forget it.

Drug-Pricing Policies Find New Momentum As ‘A 2020 Thing’

Jan 25, 2019
Wikimedia Commons

The next presidential primary contests are more than a year away. But presumed candidates are already trying to stake a claim to one of health care’s hot-button concerns: surging prescription drug prices.

“This is a 2020 thing,” said Dr. Peter Bach, who directs the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York and tracks drug-pricing policy.