Hannah Hagemann

Hannah Hagemann is a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she will work at NPR's National Desk and Weekend Edition.

She comes to NPR from the Bay Area, where she earned a master's in science journalism from UC Santa Cruz and reported for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco.

In July 2019, Hannah was one of the first reporters on the ground covering the mass shooting in Gilroy, California. Hagemann enjoys reporting stories at the intersection of community, policy and science. She has reported on climate change, fishing issues and PFAS chemicals.

Before beginning a career in journalism, Hagemann worked as a geologist. She sampled and cleaned up industrial pollution across California with drill crews, railroad foremen and high-level regulators. The work brought Hagemann to remote corners of the Mojave and sprawling air force bases, but most often she was investigating contamination in working-class communities across Los Angeles.

In her free time, Hagemann enjoys hiking, skiing, mountain biking and seeing live bluegrass and funk music. She also paints landscapes and writes poetry.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a set of documents on Thursday designed to provide guidance on how child care centers, schools, restaurants and bars, and other establishments could begin the process of reopening in the face of the coron

Eighteen of California's 58 counties have received state approval to further ease coronavirus restrictions, but major population centers such as the San Francisco Bay Area are choosing not to relax stay-at-home orders for now.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson outlined plans Sunday for a phased reopening of Britain's economy, citing decreasing coronavirus hospitalizations and deaths, and asked anyone who cannot perform their jobs from home, such as construction and factory workers, to return to work.

"There are millions of people who are both fearful of this terrible disease, and at the same time also fearful of what this long period of enforced inactivity will do to their livelihoods and their mental and physical well-being," Johnson said. "To their futures and the futures of their children."

After being treated on Tuesday for a gallbladder infection at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged on Wednesday.

"She is doing well and glad to be home," according to a Supreme Court press release.

The court said over the next few weeks Ginsburg will return to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up outpatient visits, and for a nonsurgical procedure to remove the gallstone.

Over 32,000 people have died from the new coronavirus in the United Kingdom, according to the Office for National Statistics, marking the first time in the pandemic that it has led Europe in the number of deaths.

The country has surpassed Italy in COVID-19 deaths. The U.S. still leads the world in the highest number of coronavirus deaths; over 70,270 had died from the disease as of Tuesday.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that California will allow some retail businesses to reopen with modifications as early as Friday, amid encouraging coronavirus benchmarks.

"We are entering into the next phase this week," Newsom said in his daily press briefing Monday. "This is a very positive sign and it's happened only for one reason: The data says it can happen."

The businesses will include places such as book, clothing, toy and sporting goods stores, as well as music shops and florists, the governor said.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson opened up about his nearly two-week-long battle with coronavirus on Sunday, revealing that at points during his ICU stay doctors were making arrangements for "what to do if things went badly wrong."

"It was a tough old moment, I won't deny it," the 55-year-old said in an interview with British newspaper The Sun. "They had a strategy to deal with a 'death of Stalin-type' scenario."

Johnson spent three nights in the ICU at St Thomas' Hospital in London, where he said medical workers gave him "liters and liters of oxygen."

The city councils of both Huntington Beach and Dana Point voted tonight to pursue legal action against the state of California to block Gov. Gavin Newsom's beach-closure order.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered all beaches and state parks in Orange County to temporarily close on Thursday, after images in the news showed crowds gathering on beaches there and, according to Newsom, violating the state's physical distancing rules.

A California Police Chiefs Association memo sent Wednesday informed its members that Gov. Gavin Newsom will order all California beaches and state parks to close, effective Friday.

Coronavirus antibody tests have garnered attention from officials as a potential tool to evaluate people's immunity to the illness. But the majority of companies creating the tests have had little to no regulatory oversight, according to the chair of the House Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy.

Updated at 10:31 p.m. ET

Citing President Trump's guidelines for Opening Up America Again, released last week, Gov. Brian Kemp announced at a news conference Monday steps to reopen Georgia's economy, starting this Friday.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

As of Sunday, nearly three months since the first confirmed case of the coronavirus was reported in the United States, there are over 746,300 confirmed cases of the virus in the country, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

As global cases of coronavirus top 2 million, and people across the world lose loved ones to the virus without being given the chance for final farewells, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said at a press conference Wednesday that instead of death toll numbers, he's thinking more about those lost moments.

"When you talk about where the numbers are going on this, what I'm really thinking about is all those people who aren't going to have a chance to say goodbye. "

A Pew Research Center survey conducted this month among 4,917 U.S. adults found that 27% of black people personally knew someone who was hospitalized with or died from COVID-19, compared to just 1 in 10 white and Hispanic people.

The results highlight how coronavirus is disproportionately affecting lower-income people of color.

In the last decade, bans and taxes on single-use plastic bags have been enacted in a number of states including California, Hawaii and Massachusetts and cities such as New York and Washington, D.C., as shoppers switched to reusable bags.

Now, some major grocery chains are not allowing shoppers to bring reused bags and lawmakers in a number of jurisdictions are rescinding the bans temporarily, citing health concerns prompted by the the coronavirus pandemic.

Citing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation that all Americans wear face coverings in public, starting Tuesday Starbucks will require all employees to wear one at work.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

The Ruby Princess cruise ship docked in Sydney on March 19 and nearly 2,700 passengers who were on board left freely, though some exhibited flu-like symptoms. On Sunday, Australian police announced they've launched a criminal investigation into the Ruby Princess, citing questions over whether the operators of the ship, Carnival Australia, were transparent about sickened passengers and crew members.

Pope Francis was the sole celebrant at Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the commencement of Holy Week, and the service took place without a congregation, which the Vatican press office said was a historic first for the Roman Catholic Church.

Updated at 11:11 p.m. ET

A New Jersey Army National Guardsman who had tested positive for the coronavirus and been hospitalized since March 21, died Saturday, according to the Department of Defense.

The service member was identified by Gen. Joseph Lengyel, head of the National Guard Bureau, as Army Capt. Douglas Linn Hickok, a physician assistant who served in the U.S. Army Medical Command.

The death marks the first service member to have died from the coronavirus.

In recent weeks doctors and nurses have reported dire shortages of protective gear; on the Cape Cod peninsula in Massachusetts, and in the San Francisco Bay Area, hospital workers say they're being forced to reuse N-95 masks. In New York, the current epicenter of the U.S.

A 31-year-old immigrant who is detained in a New Jersey jail by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. It is the first confirmed coronavirus case among ICE detainees. A guard at the Bergen County Jail where the man is held, also tested positive for coronavirus last week.