Carrie Pinkard

Carrie Pinkard is the Stephen Noble news intern for the summer 2019 semester. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Florida State University in English, before heading to USF St Pete to pursue a master’s in journalism.

During her first year as a graduate student at USF St Pete, Pinkard worked as Features Editor for USFSP Connect, as a science journalism intern, and as a freelance writer. Next school year, she will be the Arts and Life Editor at The Crow’s Nest.

She hopes to become proficient in many different ways of telling stories, and to one day work as a multimedia journalist.

It’s time to stock up on sandbags.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced today that the chances for an above-normal hurricane season have increased by 15% since May.

When it comes to Florida’s gun laws, there is a struggle happening between state and local governments.

The "preemption statute" that was originally passed in 1987 forbid local governments from passing gun control legislation. However, there were not harsh penalties for breaking the law.

But in 2011, the statute was changed to include punishments for local leaders who introduce gun legislation in their communities.

Those leaders face a $5,000 fine and potential removal from office.

Jordan Belliveau would have celebrated his third birthday on Monday.

Instead, the toddler died in September. He was just two when police say his mother, Charisse Stinson, struck him in the face, causing him to slam into a wall and injure his brain.

Next year, you will be able to fill out your U.S. Census form the same way you order Uber Eats – on your smart phone.

On Wednesday, local and state leaders promoting census participation talked about how 2020 will be the first year United States residents are able to fill out census information entirely online. 

On Sunday afternoon at 12:30 p.m., lifeguards along Clearwater Beach blew their whistles, warning beach goers that a storm was quickly approaching.

The lifeguards then closed the water and left the beach.

Twelve minutes later, lightning struck a man, leaving him and seven others nearby injured.

By Carrie Pinkard

The Florida Department of Education have released standardized test results for the tests taken this past spring.

The scores include the Florida Standards Assessments in English Language Arts and Math.

They’re quick, they’re noisy, and they’re out to suck your blood this summer.

As the weather heats up and Florida grows increasingly muggy, mosquitos are coming out in swarms.

The city of Bradenton is considering forming a citizen review board to oversee its police department.

Wednesday morning at 9 a.m., the city council will meet for a workshop on the subject.

An afternoon football practice turned tragic on Tuesday when a 14-year-old suddenly collapsed.

Tampa Police say the Middleton High School football team was just half an hour into conditioning drills when Hezekiah Walters fell to the ground. He was later pronounced dead at St. Joseph’s Hospital. 

University of South Florida Health and Tampa General Hospital announced at Thursday's USF Board of Trustees meeting that they will be strengthening their partnership.

The two have been working together since the College of Medicine's creation in the early 1970’s, and TGH already serves as the official teaching hospital for USF. 

Events commemorating Friday as National Gun Violence Awareness Day will be held in St Petersburg, Lakewood Ranch and Tampa. But in Temple Terrace, the city council and mayor voted not to acknowledge the day at all.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30. Emergency management officials say it's important residents know which evacuation zone they live in. Florida residents should have an evacuation plan in place before a storm is on the radar. 

Hurricane season started June 1 and officials are sending out their annual message: it's imperative to know what to do before, during, and after a storm.

It’s 95 degrees. Sunscreen and sweat drips from your forehead. You do a cannonball into a lake to cool off and are greeted by a thick coat of blue-green algae.

This is the scenario Florida’s environmental specialists are trying to prevent by enacting fertilizer restrictions.