Amy Tardif

Amy Tardif is WGCU’s FM Station Manager and News Director. She oversees a staff of 6 in news, production and the radio reading service.  Her program Lucia's Letter on human trafficking received a coveted Peabody Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award, a gold medal from the New York Festivals and 1st place for Best Documentary from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. She was the producer and host of Gulf Coast Live Arts Edition for 8 years and spent 14 years as WGCU’s local host of NPR's Morning Edition. Amy spent five years as producer and managing editor of WGCU-TV’s former monthly environmental documentary programs In Focus on the Environment and Earth Edition. She is the first woman in radio to Chair RTDNA, having previously served as Chair-Elect and the Region 13 representative on its Board of Directors for which she helped write an e-book on plagiarism and fabrication. She also serves on the FPBS Board of Directors and served on the PRNDI Board of Directors from 2007 -2012. And she served on the Editorial Integrity for Public Media Project helping to write the section on employee's activities beyond their public media work. Prior to joining WGCU Public Media in 1993, she was the spokesperson for the Fort Myers Police Department, spent 6 years reporting and anchoring for television stations in Fort Myers and Austin, Minnesota and reported for WUSF Public Radio in Tampa.  Amy also loves spending time with her two teenaged sons, performing in local theater and horseback riding.

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The Florida Department of Health in Lee County says there’s been a spike in confirmed cases of infectious syphilis in the county. They’re calling the increase alarming.

 

Tests on blue green algae at the Cape Coral Yacht Club came back with low levels of toxins that can contribute to environmental and public health problems. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection tested the algae earlier this week from two sites along the Caloosahatchee River. The other site, at the Alva Bridge, showed no toxins.

As of August first, 22 people have died from lightning strikes in the United States – that’s double the average number of deaths over the past five years. The National Weather Service says three of them were in Florida. Two men were working on rooftops. One was walking. With Florida being the lightning capital of the U.S. we take a look at the possible reasons for the increase in deaths this year, lightning myths – such as rubber tires are not why you’re safe in a car - and how to protect yourself

The Pine Manor Improvement Association’s annual teen culinary class recently graduated 8 students. The three week course teaches teens cooking basics and the importance of sustainable farming by using the community’s own garden.

Each student gets a cookbook and a set of cooking utensils to sharpen their new skills.

The Pine Manor Improvement Association’s culinary classes are the brainchild of Florida Gulf Coast University professor Chef James Fraser.

He founded ICARE – or The Institute for Culinary Awareness Research & Education. Fraser recognized a desperate need in Pine Manor, which is considered a food desert, an area with limited or no access to fresh, healthy and affordable foods.

820 Floridians could die from melanoma this year. It’s the most lethal form of skin cancer. A recent study cited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 6000 cases of melanoma are estimated to be related to indoor tanning in the U.S. each year. This story looks at one group of people seeing a dramatic rise in the number of these cases. They’re young women and teens. And they’re the same group also going to tanning salons more often.