transparency

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One of the most important things for the public during the COVID-19 public health emergency is access to reliable information from the state government.

As the number of coronavirus cases in Florida continues to rise, Congressman Vern Buchanan on Monday said the pace of testing is still too slow and called for more transparency from health officials.

A new drug to treat postpartum depression is likely to reach the U.S. market in June, with a $34,000 price tag.

Johns Hopkins Medicine has hired a former federal prosecutor to investigate the heart institute at All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg.

After the destructive repercussions Hurricane Irma had on Florida’s elderly residents, a new bill looks to address the key issue as to why they were so negatively affected.

Groups that represent industries from farming to fracking are supporting a legislative push to rewrite how government handles science when drawing up regulations.

And the whole effort has scientists worried.

Consider, for example, the Honest and Open New EPA Science Treatment Act, or HONEST Act, which passed the House in the spring and now is with the Senate. Just how "honest" it is depends on whom you ask.

Does this sound like a top health care CEO?

Or this?

Those are the comments of Baptist Health South Florida CEO Brian Keeley. Baptist Health is the largest faith-based non-profit health system in South Florida. It delivers $2 billion of health care to South Florida through seven hospitals, more than a dozen urgent care centers and various other specialty health centers. The Baptist business has more than 1,700 beds and serves more than 1 million patients per year. Keeley has been with Baptist for more than 30 years.

According to a report released Tuesday, Florida and 44 other states fail to give the public access to information on what health-care services cost, the Miami Herald reports.
 

FL Gets 'D' on Disclosure Laws for Health Care Prices

Mar 18, 2013

Wonder why you can't get a straight answer on how much a treatment or test will cost you? One big reason: State laws that allow hospitals and other providers of health care to keep costs hidden until they send you the bill.

A report card on price transparency released Monday gives 29 states an F and seven states a D for policies that keep patients and their families in the dark on prices. The failing grade went to those with practically no transparency requirements.