sunscreen

When we smear on sunscreen, dermatologist Kanade Shinkai with the University of California, San Francisco says, most of us don't think about it getting under our skin.

"I think there was an assumption that these are things that we apply to our skin — they don't really get into our bloodstream," Shinkai says.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced this week a new proposal to update safety standards for sunscreen  ingredients and marketing.

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Officials in Key West took the initial steps toward banning the sale of sunscreens containing two ingredients that could be harmful to coral reefs.

Over the summer, Hawaii became the first place in the United States to ban sunscreens with chemicals that have been found to harm corals. Now Key West is considering a similar ban. And a group opposing the ban is fighting back — online.

If you're in Key West and open a video on YouTube, there's a new ad on heavy rotation.

It's a good idea to protect your skin with sunscreen when you're out on the water.

But protecting reefs means giving up some of the most common sunscreens that can harm corals. Studies have found that some ingredients, especially oxybenzone and octinoxate, are harmful even in very small quantities.

Sunscreen is more effective than an umbrella at preventing sunburns – but may not be enough to completely prevent sunburns.

Cancer research groups, dermatologists and sunscreen makers are urging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to move forward on approving more effective sunscreen ingredients, the Tampa Bay Times reports. Suncare products currently available in the United States contain effective protection against UVB rays, but are weak against UVA rays, something products widely available in Europe and Asia already address, the Times reports.

How Sunscreen Can Burn You

Jul 5, 2013

That sunscreen you dutifully spray throughout the day could actually get you burned.

We're not talking sunburn. We're talking people bursting into flames because they're wearing sunscreen.

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration recorded five incidents in which people were burned after their sunscreen caught on fire. One person was hurt after lighting a cigarette. Another stood near a citronella candle.