climate change

Kate Stein/WLRN

On a hot day in September, Charlene Jones celebrated her 61st birthday by herself.

The former nursing-home cook made herself a birthday dinner of turkey and dressing, macaroni and cheese, string beans and butter pound cake. She ate it alone, in a dim apartment in an affordable housing complex in Miami’s West Little River neighborhood.

“I wanted to be home,” Jones said. “I don’t really like being out.”

The latest in a series of scientific reports on climate change was recently submitted to Congress. A group of Florida scientists delved into the report, and things aren't looking too good if you've got beachfront property.

Legislative advocacy group Florida Conservation Voters is asking new leadership in the State Capitol for a joint select committee on climate change.

Courtesey of WMFE

A new federal report says U.S. efforts to address climate change have expanded but not enough to stave off substantial damage to the economy, environment and human health.

Florida teachers are eager to teach kids about sea-level rise, rising heat and other impacts of climate change, but many say it can be hard to find engaging and in-depth information in their textbooks or the state curriculum.

A workshop on Wednesday offered about 30 Florida educators ideas and resources for climate education.

On a hot day in September, Charlene Jones celebrated her 61st birthday by herself.

The former nursing-home cook made herself a birthday dinner of turkey and dressing, macaroni and cheese, string beans and butter pound cake. She ate it alone, in a dim apartment in an affordable housing complex in Miami’s West Little River neighborhood.

“I wanted to be home,” Jones said. “I don’t really like being out.”

Tens, hundreds or thousands of ideas are part of what’s needed to help South Florida respond to climate change.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is starting a three-year, $3 million study to help Miami-Dade County find ways to reduce risk from storms and sea-level rise.

On Thursday, the Corps and the county launched the effort by collecting ideas from local planners, researchers and concerned citizens. For four hours, staff members sat at tables in the Miami Rowing Club on Key Biscayne and facilitated conversations with interested members of the public.

Midterm losses among moderate Florida Republicans have raised questions about the future of a climate caucus founded by two of the state's U.S. Congressmen.

A coalition of southeast Florida counties is leading the state in responding to vulnerabilities caused by climate change and sea-level rise, according to state environmental leaders.

On Thursday, officials and planners who represent Monroe, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties met at the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit to discuss progress on issues linked to climate change. Noah Valenstein, the secretary of Florida's Department of Environmental Protection, thanked the more than 300 people gathered.

Sea-level rise is beginning to impact everyday life for some neighborhoods in South Florida: roads flood, insurance prices rise, and cities and counties ask voters to help pay for adaptation projects. There may soon be impacts to the Internet.

But the water's rising only millimeters at a time. And the majority of people here don't experience serious flooding.

Florida and Louisiana face a shared threat from sea-level rise -- a threat that's growing as higher seas increase flood risk and warmer temperatures strengthen hurricanes.

Mark Schleifstein is a Pulitzer-winning environment reporter with NOLA.com and the Times-Picayune in New Orleans. He attended high school in Miami. Schleifstein spoke with WLRN’s Kate Stein about the future of both places -- and about a community that’s already had to move away from the coast because of rising seas.

Everglades restoration needs to do more to account for climate change.

That’s the headline of a report released Wednesday by a Congressionally-appointed committee of scientists.

The report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says agencies involved in restoration need to do more analysis of how sea-level rise and increasing rainfall impact Everglades projects.

Miami's mayor is joining a list of big names on a new international climate change commission.

Mayor Francis Suarez will be part of a new "Global Commission on Adaptation," led by Bill Gates, former United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and current World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva.

The commission includes 28 leaders from government, business and non-profits. They represent countries including the Marshall Islands -- one of the nations most at risk of having to relocate because of sea-level rise.

Hurricane Michael approached Florida with ferocious speed this week, hitting the Panhandle as a Category 4 hurricane and leaving behind a trail of catastrophic damage. The storm went from a depression to a serious storm in less than a week.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Michael was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

It's possible for the world to keep global warming from reaching a crisis point in the next 20 to 30 years, but it would take an effort that's unprecedented in human history.

That's according to a report released Monday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a coalition of scientists brought together by the United Nations to guide world leaders on climate impacts.

A coalition of local governments met Monday to find a way to combat climate change. But there's only so much that can be done on the local level.

On the banks of the New River, the 117-year old Historic Stranahan House and Museum is the oldest building in Fort Lauderdale. It was home to the city’s founding family, Frank and Ivy Stranahan. 

But in recent years, it has suffered the effects of climate change, according to the museum’s Executive Director, April Kirk.

 

Hundreds of artists, activists and community stakeholders across South Florida gathered in Bayfront Park on Saturday to urge politicians to make Miami more "climate resilient," or improving the ability to prevent, withstand, respond to and recover from sea level rise and climate change. 

President Trump and Florida Gov. Rick Scott have been reluctant to acknowledge the link between climate change and some of Florida's current environmental challenges, like King Tide flooding, stronger hurricanes and rising temperatures.

Caroline Lewis has made it her life mission to amplify conversations around climate change. She founded the CLEO Institute in Miami in 2010 and has focused her efforts on educating the public.

NASA

As they address environmental issues on the campaign trail, Florida’s gubernatorial candidates are all for doing what is necessary to eliminate toxic algae outbreaks and for preserving natural springs and rivers.

ReThink Energy Florida and First Street Foundation are hosting a series of Tidal Town Halls where politicians will address the threat of sea level rise in Florida as part of the 2018 midterm election cycle.

The Ft. Lauderdale Tidal Town Hall will be on Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Nova Southeastern University at 3301 College Ave. in Fort Lauderdale. Click on the link above for details.

If current sea-level rise trends continue, the ocean that makes many South Florida cities desirable places to live may become an existential threat.

This month, First Coast Connect host Melissa Ross traveled to Rhode Island for a fellowship for journalists to learn about the science of climate change. 

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

Days after eight kids sued the state of Florida for policies they say contribute to climate change, a coalition of environment groups has launched a statewide campaign to get Floridians engaged on the issue.

Wikimedia Commons

A new study suggests climate change is transforming the forests of the eastern United States.

An ugly moment at a meeting of Miami's sea-level rise committee last week has prompted controversy over one of its members and a discussion over the committee's mission.

Pages