cancer research

By the age of 4, Hadiyah-Nicole Green had lost both her mother and her grandparents.

She was sent to live with her Aunt Ora Lee Smith and Uncle General Lee Smith in St Louis, Mo. But in her early 20s, both her aunt and uncle were diagnosed with cancer.

Green, who now works as an assistant professor in the surgery department at Morehouse College's medical school, started the Ora Lee Smith Cancer Research Foundation in honor of her late aunt.

Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nunez.
The News Service of Florida

A smoldering controversy over Florida’s landmark tobacco settlement and how money should be spent has been snuffed out.

Science relies on the careful collection and analysis of facts. Science also benefits from human judgment, but that intuition isn't necessarily reliable. A study finds that scientists did a poor job forecasting whether a successful experiment would work on a second try.

That matters, because scientists can waste a lot of time if they read the results from another lab and eagerly chase after bum leads.

MATTHEW ORR

Less of the research presented at a prominent cancer conference is supported by the National Institutes of Health, a development that some of the country’s top scientists see as a worrisome trend.

Associated Press

President Barack Obama has signed into law legislation that makes new investments in cancer research and battling drug abuse.

President Barack Obama in his State of the Union address called for renewed vigor in the fight against cancer. Drawing parallels to John F. Kennedy’s goal to place a man on the moon, Obama charged Vice President Joe Biden to lead a national “moonshot” initiative to eliminate the disease responsible for the deaths of almost 600,000 U.S. citizens’ a year.

Researchers are looking into a new way to fight cancer. Their source weighs thousands of pounds, has four legs and a trunk.

They’re elephants, and they rarely get cancer.  

The Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus’ elephant retirement facility in Central Florida teamed up with the researchers to figure out why. They hope they can use their research to help people.

Daylina Miller/WUSF News

This year, the National Institutes of Health received $2 billion more for medical research than in previous years, bringing its national funding to $32 billion.

But that's not enough, researchers say. 

When Gov. Rick Scott announced plans to spend tax dollars to boost Florida’s cancer centers, those associated with the Mayo Clinic - Jacksonville welcomed the news, since it treats thousands of cancer patients and is part of the National Cancer Institute system through its headquarters in Minnesota.  But as the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau reports, the pleasant feeling was short-lived.