League of Women Voters

A local political organization is trying to show people there are things they can do to keep their community safer from gun violence.

Some Jacksonville parents Thursday joined the League of Women Voters in filing a lawsuit against the Duval County Public School District for hiring armed staffers to patrol school grounds.

It's mid-morning on a weekday at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Miami, and Gloria Lewis is squeezed inside her office. Lewis, a suicide prevention coordinator at the Miami VA, sits amidst a giant, shrink-wrapped pallet of boxes. 

Outside the door, a cluster of women in matching red polo shirts are arriving to visit Lewis. They're all volunteers from the League of Women Voters in Broward County and they are feet away from what they drove down to Miami to collect.

Recent media reports detailing mistakes by Florida’s Department of Agriculture in issuing firearm permits have some advocacy organizations calling for further investigation. The League of Women Voters is asking Attorney General Pam Bondi to conduct the probe.

A Saturday afternoon (6/3) march and rally in Tallahassee targeted gun violence across the nation and closer to home. Several groups, including the League of Women Voters, organized the protest.

Fifty people, including the gunman, died in Orlando’s Pulse nightclub on June 12, 2016, and Florida gun control advocates hoped lawmakers would be compelled to propose stricter gun laws. They urged a special legislative session.

Tampa General Hospital

Hillsborough County hospitals are scheduled to lose more than $151 million a year in funds for care of the uninsured beginning June 30, according to a report released Thursday.

The scheduled changes to two revenue streams “represent a tremendous loss of federal funding to the county and pose a significant risk,” warns the report by the Community Justice Project, part of Florida Legal Services.

Statewide, the coming annual loss will be $2.1 billion, estimates co-author Charlotte Cassel.

Carol Gentry / Health News Florida/WUSF

A lot of money - $200 million a month or $7 million a day – could be used to buy health coverage for Florida's poor. But it all could go to some other state, said advocates who held a Capitol press conference Wednesday with the message: “Take the Money!”

Two more Republican governors of big states have agreed to accept federal funds that will allow an expansion of Medicaid health coverage to low-income uninsured adults.