health care subsidies

Florida Blue

The CEO of Florida’s largest health insurance company says he expects federal payments to make health insurance cheaper will continue through 2017.

Health Law Fines Double for Many Uninsured at Tax Time

Mar 9, 2016

Many people who went without health insurance last year are now seeing fines more than double under President Barack Obama's health care law, tax preparation company H&R Block said Tuesday.

Among its customers who owe a penalty for the 2015 tax year, the average fine is $383, compared with $172 for 2014, the company said.

About 1.4 million households that got financial help for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law failed to properly account for it on their tax returns last year, putting their subsidies at risk if they want to keep coverage.

http://boehner.house.gov/

Having lost their latest war against President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, Republicans must decide how to wage battles that could fan the issue for the 2016 elections.

Last month's Supreme Court decision upholding the statute's federal subsidies, which help millions of Americans afford health care, shattered the GOP's best chance of forcing Obama to accept a weakening of his prized law. Without that leverage, Obama would likely veto any major changes they'd send him.

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Despite White House veto threats, the House is ready to vote to repeal taxes on medical devices and kill a Medicare advisory board that foes say would ration health care as the chamber aims its latest whack at President Barack Obama's health care law.

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

HealthCare.gov

The Obama administration gave conditional approval Monday to Arkansas, Delaware and Pennsylvania to expand their roles in the insurance marketplaces created under the 2010 health care law, ahead of a high court decision that could wipe out federal health insurance subsidies for millions.

The U.S. Supreme Court this week hears a challenge to President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. If successful, the lawsuit would cripple Obama's prized domestic achievement, a program that has brought the U.S. as close as it has ever come to universal health care.

The Affordable Care Act passed Congress in 2010 without a single Republican vote in favor.

An explanation of the legal case:

Four Words Determine the Law's Future

U.S. Supreme Court

A U.S. Supreme Court decision expected this summer could quickly change how Floridians with insurance through HealthCare.gov pay for coverage.

Arguments being held in the case of King v. Burwell this week will decide whether low- and moderate-income Floridians and residents in 36 other states can get tax credits for plans they buy through the federal government.

The impact of the ruling could be seen within 30 to 60 days of a decision, said Timothy Jost, a law professor at Washington and Lee University in Virginia.

Nearly all of the 1.3 million Floridians who signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act earned tax credits averaging $297 per person, per month, according to a report released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

As of Jan. 30, 93 percent of those enrolling earned the credits toward their monthly premiums. On average, monthly premiums for consumers dropped by 77 percent, from $384 to $88 per month, according to the report.

More than 1.3 million Floridians have signed up for health insurance through the federal marketplace so far under the Affordable Care Act.

Federal health officials said Wednesday that about 57 percent are part of the nearly 1 million who are re-enrolling and 43 percent selected a plan for the first time. About 32 percent were under the age of 35.

The second enrollment period started in November and ends Feb. 15. Consumers can sign up in person, call the government hotline or go online. Those who don't sign up during that time may have to wait until next year.