weather

A massive cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert is arriving along the U.S. Gulf Coast this week after traveling across the Atlantic Ocean. The phenomenon happens every year – but the 2020 version is especially large and imposing, experts said.

The dust cloud is "quite large" this year, said Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia, in an interview on NPR's All Things Considered. "I think that's why it's garnering so much attention."

The massive cloud of dust is blanketing the Caribbean as it heads to the U.S. with a size and concentration level that meteorologists say hasn't been seen in roughly half a century.
NOAA

A massive cloud of Sahara dust is blanketing the Caribbean as it heads to the U.S. with a size and concentration that experts say hasn’t been seen in half a century.

Changes Floridians have made as a result of coronavirus could turn out helping them during hurricane season.

Ray Hawthorne is a meteorologist with the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. Hawthorne was a guest earlier today on The State We're In - a Facebook Live show from WUSF and WMFE in Orlando. 

While most of us are still sheltering in place, trying to ride out the storm of coronavirus, well -- guess what -- a real storm may be just around the corner.

The Tampa Bay region should brace for strong storm surge, gusty winds and periods of heavy rain from a system, now Tropical Storm Nestor, that intensifed on Friday as it speeds across the Gulf of Mexico on a path toward the Florida Panhandle.

It’s the middle of August in Florida, which means we should be accustomed to the sweltering, suffocating heat we’ve been sweating through across the Tampa Bay area – especially since the end of last week.

But if you been thinking these oppressive conditions feel just a bit worse than normal, you’re right.

It turns out that Sunday’s heat levels broke records in some parts of the region, and this trend will continue at least for the next couple of days.

Florida Had Hottest May In More Than A Century

Jun 7, 2019
Sun in the sky with white clouds
Mediengestalter / Pixabay

If last month felt hotter than normal, there's a reason. 

The National Hurricane Center plans to shrink the dreaded "cone of uncertainty" during the upcoming season based on an improving forecast record.

Riccardo Maria Mantero / Flickr

It's been a historically hot July in Miami.

Lottie Watts / WUSF

Consider this past weekend a dry run -- in spite of all the rain – for tropical storm and hurricane preparation.  Tropical Storm Erika never made it to Florida, but emergency officials spent much of last week urging people to get ready.