water standards

Court Clears Way For Challenge To Water Standards

Jul 12, 2017
p1 lawyer / Flickr

Nearly a year after a state regulatory commission approved controversial new water-quality standards, an appeals court Tuesday ruled that a pulp-and-paper industry group should be able to challenge the measures.

With a series of legal challenges still hanging fire, environmental groups are asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to reject Florida’s controversial water quality standards.

The Seminole Tribe of Florida is asking an administrative law judge for more time to fight the state’s controversial new water quality standards.

Martin County is putting its legal challenge of the state’s highly controversial new water quality standards on hold – at least for now.

County attorney Elizabeth Lenihan convinced commissioners to wait for an independent study before deciding whether to appeal a hearing officer’s adverse ruling.

“Doing it that way is not going to jeopardize our ability to challenge an existing rule or challenge it at the federal level.”

Health workers are piecing together a complicated puzzle in El Paso County, Colo. In January, three cities — Security, Fountain and Widefield — noticed synthetic chemicals known as PFCs in the drinking water.

Challenges To New Water Standards Tossed Out

Sep 15, 2016

Siding with the Department of Environmental Protection on procedural grounds, an administrative law judge has rejected a series of challenges to controversial new state water-quality standards.

Martin County Challenges New Water Standards

Aug 29, 2016
NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY

Pointing to concerns about increased chemicals going into Lake Okeechobee and nearby waterways, Martin County has filed a legal challenge to controversial new state water-quality standards.


Federal lawmakers from Florida are criticizing the state’s recent decision to allow for higher levels of toxins in its waterways. They’re worried about public health because some of the toxins cause cancer.

The Florida Environmental Regulation Commission approved increased levels for about 20 different toxins in Florida surface waters, like rivers and estuaries. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would still have to approve the move.

Nine members of Congress recently sent the EPA a letter voicing their concern.