veteran

Airmen at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa are taking a break from their normal duties Friday. Instead, they will reflect on mental health.

The new certificate recognizes as many as 550,000 veterans who were exposed to nuclear weapons tests between 1945 and 1992. But the certificates leave a lot of atomic veterans underwhelmed.

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FBI: Vet Shoots, Wounds Doctor Before Mental Health Check

Feb 28, 2019
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The FBI says a 59-year-old U.S. Army veteran has shot and wounded a doctor just before a mental health evaluation at a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Riviera Beach, Florida. 

It may seem counterintuitive – but a military medic or corpsman, trained to save lives in combat and provide health care at home, does not qualify for most civilian medical jobs.

What’s worse – many veterans are at a competitive disadvantage when seeking admittance into nursing colleges.

Lottie Watts / WUSF

The federal government has acknowledged that it wrongly declared more than 100 veterans dead and suspended their benefit payments, and says it is changing its policy of confirming deaths.

You can be a part of our audience for a special Florida Matters town hall featuring a panel discussion and preview of the new Ric Burns film “Debt of Honor: Disabled Veterans in American History.”

VA Secretary Visits Florida Facilities

Oct 1, 2014

The new Secretary of Veteran Affairs is in Florida today to hear from veterans and talk to VA employees about his initiative to restore trust in the VA and eliminate the backlog of claims and long waits for health care.

Army Ranger Cory Remsburg 'Leads the Way'

Sep 24, 2014

Army Ranger Cory Remsburg returns each year to James A. Haley VA Hospital in Tampa to show the staff his progress. He was severely injured in 2009 and spent two years recovering at Haley’s Polytrauma Center.

Remsburg was on his tenth deployment when he was injured by an IED in Afghanistan. His teammates found him face down in a water-filled canal with shrapnel in his brain.

He was in a coma when he arrived at the Haley.

During a visit to Gainesville’s Malcom Randall VA Medical Center Thursday, the acting secretary confirmed that Florida facilities are included in the ongoing national investigation, the Gainesville Sun reports.

Office of Special Counsel

The head of the Office of Special Counsel in Washington sent President Barack Obama a scathing letter about the VA's failure to take responsibility for the patients who may have been harmed by hospitals' system of keeping double books for appointments.

VA Doctors Tried to Blow Whistle

Jun 2, 2014

Air Force veteran Marc Schenker of Fort Lauderdale gave up waiting for the VA hospital in Miami to repair his hernia. He had it done at a private-sector hospital and charged it to Medicare.

Schenker is one of many veterans who contacted the New York Times last week to say they like the quality of VA care but hate the wait.

After CBS4 News reported last month that a veteran died from a cocaine overdose while at the Miami VA’s drug rehab center, a criminal investigator for the VA police department in Miami has come forward with more details about drug dealing that he says happened every day on hospital grounds. Detective Thomas Fiore tells the Miami TV station that marijuana, cocaine, and heroin were for sale at the Miami VA.

VA

  Florida Republican Rep. Jeff Miller, chairman of the U.S. House Veterans Affairs Committee, is sponsoring a bill that would speed up the firing process for senior executives at the VA, the Associated Press  reports. The bill comes amid whistleblower reports of delays in treatment and deaths at VA facilities, including allegations that as many as 40 veterans died while waiting for care at a VA in Phoenix, Ariz.

The experience Florida’s 1.5 million veterans have navigating the VA Health System provide a clue as to whether the “titanic” Obamacare system can succeed, Pete Hegseth writes in an opinion column for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. The CEO of Concerned Veterans for America says the government should focus on fixing the backlog and other problems facing veterans first. 

Chris O'Meara / Associated Press

Thanks to a federal program, Chris Ott of Tampa gets a stipend of about $2,000 per month to stay home and care for her son, a Marine veteran who was paralyzed and nearly blinded in the war in Iraq, the Associated Press reports. The rules of the program allow caregiver stipends only for injuries that occurred since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

March Family

Frustrated by the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital, 29-year-old Nicole March has turned to Change.org to garner support to get federally funded nursing care for her 90-year-old father, who served in the military during two wars, the Tampa Tribune reports.