University of South Florida

University of South Florida President Steven Currall announced Friday that the school has moved to a modified Phase II of its return-to-campus plan.

The University of South Florida is rolling out its plan to reopen its campuses.

Phase one of a four phase plan approved last week by the Board of Trustees goes into effect Monday.

Because of COVID-19, the University of South Florida has been closed to all but essential personnel since March, with classes in the last half of the spring and all summer being held online.

That will soon change, as trustees approved a plan Tuesday that gradually reopens the school for the fall semester.

Florida A&M University is planning to shift more classes online for the fall. The school is also limiting what classes will be offered in-person, and anyone on campus will have to follow certain rules related to social distancing. FAMU’s Chief Ethics officer Rica Calhoun gave examples during Thursday's Board of Trustees meeting.

Columbia, Brown, Penn, Purdue — universities with hallowed traditions, proud alumni and another thing in common: Right now they're being sued by disgruntled students.

The students claim that when campuses shut down amid the coronavirus pandemic, they should have been entitled to more of their money back. And the list of institutions facing such challenges is growing, including private institutions and entire public systems in California, Florida, North Carolina and Arizona.

The coronavirus test wasn't as bad as Celeste Torres imagined. Standing outside a dorm at the University of California, San Diego, Torres stuck a swab up a nostril, scanned a QR code, and went on with the day.

"The process itself was about five minutes," Torres says, "I did cry a little bit just because it's, I guess, a natural reaction."

With summer classes starting online Monday, University of South Florida officials continue to work on plans for the fall – and there is at least one surprising statistic they are keeping in mind when making any decisions.

While some groups are at a higher risk for COVID-19, no one is immune from the spread of the disease.

University of South Florida senior Geoffrey Watters is recovering from a mild case of COVID-19, just in time to graduate this month. But the 22-year-old still has concerns about others who may not be as lucky.

While Florida businesses and institutions are trying to figure out how - and how fast - they'll reopen under Gov. Ron DeSantis' plan, universities are also discussing how they will bring students back to campus.

Like many others, the University of South Florida is looking at a phased approach.

Hillsborough and Pinellas County residents will be able to view areas where people are experiencing symptoms related to COVID-19 with a new online program from the University of South Florida.


Funding medical research can be difficult in the best of times – let alone during a pandemic.

But donations to the University of South Florida’s Pandemic Research and Response Fund are helping the school’s research teams and front-line workers combat the spread of the coronavirus.

A member of the University of South Florida’s Counseling Center in Tampa has tested positive for coronavirus.

The coronavirus is causing local universities to bring home some of their students who were studying abroad.

In March, WUSF was the only media outlet invited to join students and agents from the FBI on a visit to a University of South Florida-run facility where researchers learn what happens to the dead when they're exposed to Florida's elements.

But USF will lose its access to the site in a few years, raising questions of both why and what’s next.

Children's recreational sports are growing more competitive than ever, and with that can come big injuries. 

A first-of-its-kind study on children ages 5 to 11 who play recreational sports has found that concussions are the most common injury in this age group.

With Florida being an international travel destination, there could be a risk for infectious diseases from foreign countries. And the risk of bioterrorism remains a possibility as well.

These and other topics will be the focus as the University of South Florida hosts the first ever Global Health, Diplomacy and National Security Symposium Feb. 28 in Tampa.

If what he says is true, Samuel Little would be one of the worst serial killers in U-S history.

The 78-year-old claims that between 1970 and 2005, he murdered 90 people, mostly women, around the country. That includes some in Tampa, Plant City, and elsewhere around Florida.

Now investigators, including University of South Florida forensic anthropologist Erin Kimmerle, are trying to determine the validity of Little’s claims, as well as the identities of some of his victims.

Tampa General Hospital performed its first kidney transplant in 1974 and by 1985 had completed Florida’s first successful heart transplant. In October of this year, they hit the ten-thousand transplant mark.

State wildlife officials reported this past Friday that elevated levels of the organism Karenia brevis are persisting along Florida's gulf coast, which is creating toxic red tide algae blooms from Pinellas County down to Collier County.

A study seven years in the making by University of South Florida researchers has created a map of how many species live in the Gulf of Mexico. This will give experts an idea of how much damage would take place from a future oil spill.

No more computer models or projections. Finally – concrete data.

A scientific paper published in February may pave the way for a new conversation about rising sea levels using data instead of projections.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The University of South Florida has formed a partnership with a network of hospitals to train more doctors in the Tampa Bay area.

Are you a ‘dog person,’ yet you own a cat? Is there a way to increase the emotional connection with your pet? Can overindulging your pet encourage them to misbehave?

A researcher at USF Sarasota-Manatee is looking at how the interactions between humans and their animals contribute to the physical, social and psychological well-being of both sides of such a relationship.

You probably know the Nietzsche quote: “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

One University of South Florida researcher is studying that adage – in nature.

According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes – many of them the Type 2 form of the disease. That's where the body doesn't produce enough insulin on its own.

Among the $410 million worth of projects struck from the new state budget by Governor Rick Scott's veto pen are a number of items with ties to the Tampa Bay area.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

A "body farm" where researchers can study how corpses decompose will open next week in the Tampa Bay area with the burial of four donated bodies.

Officials from Pasco County and the University of South Florida attended a dedication ceremony Friday for the Adam Kennedy Forensics Field, a three and a half acre patch of land on the grounds of the Pasco Sheriff's detention facility in Land O' Lakes, just north of Tampa.

tharms5 (Flickr)

As legislators work out the details of implementing medical marijuana, pharmacists at the University of South Florida are determining how to deliver it as medication.

The University of South Florida temporarily stopped one researcher's work with the West Nile Virus earlier this year after eight birds died during the research.

According to a statement from USF, that work has since been restarted after the issues involved were addressed.

Albuminarium

More Americans are living longer and surviving chronic conditions like heart disease and cancer but that’s led to rising number of neurological disorders, which disproportionately affect the elderly.

A new report from University of South Florida researchers has estimated just how much money those disorders are costing patients and the health care industry -- nearly $800 billion a year.

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