University of South Florida

In March, WUSF was the only media outlet invited to join students and agents from the FBI on a visit to a University of South Florida-run facility where researchers learn what happens to the dead when they're exposed to Florida's elements.

But USF will lose its access to the site in a few years, raising questions of both why and what’s next.

Children's recreational sports are growing more competitive than ever, and with that can come big injuries. 

A first-of-its-kind study on children ages 5 to 11 who play recreational sports has found that concussions are the most common injury in this age group.

With Florida being an international travel destination, there could be a risk for infectious diseases from foreign countries. And the risk of bioterrorism remains a possibility as well.

These and other topics will be the focus as the University of South Florida hosts the first ever Global Health, Diplomacy and National Security Symposium Feb. 28 in Tampa.

If what he says is true, Samuel Little would be one of the worst serial killers in U-S history.

The 78-year-old claims that between 1970 and 2005, he murdered 90 people, mostly women, around the country. That includes some in Tampa, Plant City, and elsewhere around Florida.

Now investigators, including University of South Florida forensic anthropologist Erin Kimmerle, are trying to determine the validity of Little’s claims, as well as the identities of some of his victims.

Tampa General Hospital performed its first kidney transplant in 1974 and by 1985 had completed Florida’s first successful heart transplant. In October of this year, they hit the ten-thousand transplant mark.

State wildlife officials reported this past Friday that elevated levels of the organism Karenia brevis are persisting along Florida's gulf coast, which is creating toxic red tide algae blooms from Pinellas County down to Collier County.

A study seven years in the making by University of South Florida researchers has created a map of how many species live in the Gulf of Mexico. This will give experts an idea of how much damage would take place from a future oil spill.

No more computer models or projections. Finally – concrete data.

A scientific paper published in February may pave the way for a new conversation about rising sea levels using data instead of projections.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The University of South Florida has formed a partnership with a network of hospitals to train more doctors in the Tampa Bay area.

Are you a ‘dog person,’ yet you own a cat? Is there a way to increase the emotional connection with your pet? Can overindulging your pet encourage them to misbehave?

A researcher at USF Sarasota-Manatee is looking at how the interactions between humans and their animals contribute to the physical, social and psychological well-being of both sides of such a relationship.

You probably know the Nietzsche quote: “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

One University of South Florida researcher is studying that adage – in nature.

According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes – many of them the Type 2 form of the disease. That's where the body doesn't produce enough insulin on its own.

Among the $410 million worth of projects struck from the new state budget by Governor Rick Scott's veto pen are a number of items with ties to the Tampa Bay area.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

A "body farm" where researchers can study how corpses decompose will open next week in the Tampa Bay area with the burial of four donated bodies.

Officials from Pasco County and the University of South Florida attended a dedication ceremony Friday for the Adam Kennedy Forensics Field, a three and a half acre patch of land on the grounds of the Pasco Sheriff's detention facility in Land O' Lakes, just north of Tampa.

tharms5 (Flickr)

As legislators work out the details of implementing medical marijuana, pharmacists at the University of South Florida are determining how to deliver it as medication.

The University of South Florida temporarily stopped one researcher's work with the West Nile Virus earlier this year after eight birds died during the research.

According to a statement from USF, that work has since been restarted after the issues involved were addressed.

Albuminarium

More Americans are living longer and surviving chronic conditions like heart disease and cancer but that’s led to rising number of neurological disorders, which disproportionately affect the elderly.

A new report from University of South Florida researchers has estimated just how much money those disorders are costing patients and the health care industry -- nearly $800 billion a year.

Some students in the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine experienced the "luck of the Irish" this past Friday, as they got their first choice of hospital where they'll do their residencies.

It was all part of "Match Day," where students open an envelope that sets them on their career path for the next three to seven years, depending on their specialty.

When crimes like the Pulse nightclub shooting or the shootings at the Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport occur, there are two major responses by law enforcement.

First, there's the immediate, tactical reply. Then there's the forensic investigation.

A center that brings training for those two stages together under one roof is in the works in Pasco County, and University of South Florida researchers are playing a major role.

Wikimedia Commons

The University of South Florida will use a $1.1 million dollar state grant for Zika research to look at how the virus infects fetuses.

Every semester, the University of South Florida picks an outstanding graduate on each of the system’s three campuses.

This fall, the honoree on the Tampa campus has a curriculum vitae that would make some professors jealous.

Stephanie Radu, 21, was born in Toronto and lived in twelve cities, training as a competitive swimmer and surfer, before settling in Florida.

Jeffrey Sargent enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after graduating from high school in 1999. He ended up serving 12 years, including two tours of duty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. During that time, he received a Bronze Star, but also lost several members of his unit, including his platoon leader.

Over a decade into his military career, during a promotion ceremony to Sgt. First Class, he suffered his first panic attack. It was the initial sign of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

President Barack Obama has postponed his appearance at the University of South Florida in Tampa on Wednesday because of Hurricane Matthew.

Governor Gives Backing To Dozier ‘Justice’ Bill

Mar 31, 2016
USF DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY

Gov. Rick Scott on Wednesday signed a bill addressing what one lawmaker described as a "dark chapter" in Florida history at a now-shuttered reform school.

Rhea Chiles, the widow of former governor Lawton Chiles, died last November in her home on Anna Maria Island,  at the age of 84. She dedicated her life to improving the lives of children in Florida.

The University of South Florida’s College of Public Health recently held a symposium to honor the legacy of Rhea Chiles' work. This week on Florida Matters (Tuesday, March 1 at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 6 at 7:30 a.m.) we bring you highlights of the discussion.

USF forensic anthropologists are getting extra money to crack cold cases. 

They've been awarded a $386,537 grant from the National Institute of Justice - the research wing of the U.S. Department of Justice - to examine 50 unsolved cases. 

The March of Dimes has  issued its 2015 report card on early births across the country and Florida gets bad grades for its premature birth rates.

The state earned a C this year for having a premature birth rate of 9.9 percent—just about one in every 10 babies born in Florida. The March of Dimes goal is 8.1 percent.

You can be a part of our audience for a special Florida Matters town hall featuring a panel discussion and preview of the new Ric Burns film “Debt of Honor: Disabled Veterans in American History.”

A majority of Floridians believe that the state is not providing good medical care to people with disabilities, according to the annual Sunshine State Survey results released Tuesday.

Susan MacManus, the survey director and University of South Florida political scientist,  said concerns over health care for the state’s most vulnerable received some of the most negative findings.

Associated Press/Chris O'Meara

In a basement classroom on the University of South Florida campus, Joe Mullins is bringing the dead back to life.

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