special needs

Thousands of dollars in special equipment will soon be on the way to people in the storm-impacted Florida Panhandle who have disabilities.

Bills aimed at fixing a glitch in a Florida law have cleared their first legislative committees in the House and Senate. The two measures could get more pro bono attorneys to help kids with special needs.

The construction of the Florida Holocaust Memorial is one step closer to becoming reality. That's among 20 bills Governor Rick Scott signed into law Wednesday.

More than 100,000 Floridians depend on electrical power to keep life-saving medical devices running, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The interactive map released Tuesday shows that nationwide, 1.6 million Medicare patients need power for medical devices.

Senators Look For More Ways To Boost Adoptions

Feb 19, 2015

A bill that would provide incentives to state employees who adopt children in Florida's foster-care system continued moving forward Wednesday with several changes.

The Senate Health and Human Services Appropriations Subcommittee unanimously approved the measure (SB 320) by Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, with amendments aimed at boosting adoptions still further.

The bill would provide a one-time cash payment of $5,000 per child to state employees who adopt children from the foster-care system and $10,000 per child for those who adopt children who also have special needs.

Pediatricians are worried the privatization of the state’s Children’s Medical Services program will leave some children without services, the News Service of Florida reports.

Medicaid coverage for these children changes to pre-paid health plans on Aug. 1. Some pediatricians think the transition has been poorly planned and could leave as many as 70,000 children without medical coverage.

Miami Herald

Nova Southeastern University offers a dental clinic that welcomes patients who have very specialized needs: people with mental illness or a physical disability, such as cerebral palsy, that makes an ordinary dentist’s office hard to navigate, the Miami Herald reports. More than half a million Florida residents who have mental or physical disabilities went without dental care last year, the state found.