prescription drug prices

Florida sent federal officials a detailed plan for how the state proposes to safely import prescription drugs from Canada and other countries on Friday.

The Trump administration has dropped one of the meatiest portions of its plan to reduce drug prices.

The Department of Health and Human Services said it will no longer pursue a rule that would have prohibited the payment of certain rebates on drugs in Medicare Part D and Medicaid plans.

The idea was to target the middlemen, pharmacy benefit managers, whose negotiations with drugmakers and insurers influence the costs consumers pay for drugs.

The Money And Politics Of Prescription Drugs: What You Need To Know

May 8, 2019
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If there’s one area of health care where Republicans and Democrats might strike a deal, it’s prescription drugs. 

House Approves Canadian Drug Imports

Apr 12, 2019
Pharmacy Technician amongst two shelves of prescription pills.
Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

Drugs from Canada could be imported into Florida if the federal government agrees, under a bill that passed the state House on Thursday. 

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Governor Ron DeSantis says it might take some time before Florida patients can get prescription drugs from Canada through a program he announced last week. That’s because some federal agencies are still concerned with the availability and quality of these drugs. 

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A look at one of President Donald Trump's statements from his State of the Union address on Tuesday night and how it compares with the facts: 

Drug-Pricing Policies Find New Momentum As ‘A 2020 Thing’

Jan 25, 2019
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The next presidential primary contests are more than a year away. But presumed candidates are already trying to stake a claim to one of health care’s hot-button concerns: surging prescription drug prices.

“This is a 2020 thing,” said Dr. Peter Bach, who directs the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York and tracks drug-pricing policy.

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Less than two weeks before the midterm elections, President Donald Trump has announced a plan to lower prices for some prescription drugs, saying it would stop unfair practices that force Americans to pay much more than people in other countries for the same medications.

When Anne Soloviev went to Braun Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center in Washington, D.C., for her semiannual dermatology checkup in early January, the physician assistant diagnosed fungus in two of her toenails.

Soloviev hadn't complained about her toenails or even noticed a problem.

But the physician assistant offered a solution anyway. She called in a prescription for an antifungal medicine to a specialty pharmacy with mail-order services that would send it to Soloviev's Capitol Hill home.

Facing bipartisan hostility over high drug prices in an election year, the pharmaceutical industry's biggest trade group boosted revenue by nearly a fourth in 2016 and spread the millions collected among hundreds of lobbyists, politicians and patient groups, new filings show.

Insurers, hospitals and health advocates are waiting for Gov. Jerry Brown to deal the drug lobby a rare defeat, by signing legislation that would force pharmaceutical companies to justify big price hikes on drugs in California.

When teaching hospitals put pharmaceutical sales representatives on a shorter leash, their doctors tended to order fewer promoted brand-name drugs and used more generic versions instead, a study published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association, shows.

Drug companies could be forgiven if they're confused about whether President Trump thinks the government should get involved in negotiating the price of prescription drugs for Medicare patients.

Just a few days before Trump was sworn in, he said the pharmaceutical industry was "getting away with murder" in the way it prices medicine, and he promised to take the industry on. It was a promise he'd made repeatedly on the campaign trail.

Editor's note: Updated at 9:20 am ET to include Mylan's announcement that it will reimburse consumers for some of their out-of-pocket costs.

EpiPens are in your friend's purse and your kid's backpack. The school nurse has a few, as does Grandma.

The medicine inside — epinephrine — has been around forever, and the handy gadget that injects it into your leg is not particularly new either.

Prescription drug prices continue to climb, putting the pinch on consumers. Some older Americans appear to be seeking an alternative to mainstream medicines that has become easier to get legally in many parts of the country. Just ask Cheech and Chong.