pregnant

Need another reason to get the flu shot if you're pregnant?

A study out this week shows that pregnant women with the flu who are hospitalized in an intensive care unit are four times more likely to deliver babies prematurely and four and a half times more likely to have a baby of low birth weight.

When Allison Matthews was pregnant with her first child four years ago, her obstetrics clinic scheduled frequent appointments to make sure everything was proceeding normally.

"I was taking time off work and it wasn't doing a lot for me," says Matthews, who was considered at low risk for complications like pregnancy-related high blood pressure, also known as preeclampsia. "I kind of felt like I was almost doing it more for the clinic's benefit than for myself."

Two-year old Maverick Hawkins sits on a red plastic car in his grandmother's living room in the picturesque town of Nevada City, Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. His playpal Delilah Smith, a fellow 2-year-old, snacks on hummus and cashews and delights over the sounds of her Princess Peppa stuffie.

It's playtime for the kids of the provocatively named Facebook group "Pot Smoking Moms Who Cuss Sometimes."

Hoping to get ahead of potential Zika outbreaks, Planned Parenthood of Collier County is launching a new education initiative aimed at prevention. While anyone is a target for a mosquito carrying the virus, the awareness program aims to help women protect their unborn children from the virus in underserved communities like Immokalee.

Getting the flu while pregnant doesn't appear to increase the child's risk of being diagnosed with autism later on, a study finds, and neither does getting a flu shot while pregnant.

Three More Pregnant Women Diagnosed With Zika

Nov 2, 2016
WMFE

Florida health officials Tuesday reported seven more cases of the mosquito-borne Zika virus, including three infections involving pregnant women.

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Yessica Flores is getting ultrasounds more frequently than the average pregnant woman, but there's a cruel downside accompanying the joy of seeing how much her unborn daughter grows every few weeks: fear of possible defects caused by Zika.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strengthened its Zika guidance Wednesday, recommending that pregnant women consider postponing travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County and reiterating a recommendation that pregnant county residents take steps to prevent the virus's spread.

The updated guidance reflects concerns that the virus may be spreading in areas throughout the county, not just in the two "Zika zones" on Miami Beach and near Little River.

WMFE

The Zika virus has changed how blood banks collect donations in Florida – and now it’s changing sperm and egg donations as well.

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott says pregnant women statewide can get a free Zika test to determine whether they've been infected with the mosquito-borne virus.

Over 150 pregnant women in the United States appear to have been infected with Zika virus. That's in addition to more than 120 women affected by Zika in U.S. territories, mainly Puerto Rico.

Those are the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, which has been keeping track of all pregnant women in the U.S. and its territories who have lab tests suggestive of Zika virus infections.

Kimberly Richardson has never gotten a flu shot. Since she's healthy and considers the seasonal vaccines a "best-guess concoction" of the viruses expected to dominate, the northern California gym teacher and mother of two says she didn't want an "injection of something that may or may not keep me healthy in the long run."

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A Brevard County woman has died and two other people in the county are in critical condition from the flu. The unidentified woman, who was in her mid-30s, died Sunday at Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne, the Orlando Sentinel reports.