mosquito

"It's up to you," said a 1945 public service announced aimed at Americans. Find "one of man's worst enemies" and "destroy their foxholes."

The video came from the Office of Malaria Control in War Areas (now known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). And it was talking about a particular species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti — the very same mosquito in the news now. Back then, public health officials were mostly worried about dengue and yellow fevers.

Muhammad Mahdi Karim / Wikimedia Commons

The Zika pandemic has gotten people talking about mosquito control.

But humans aren’t the only ones affected by mosquito-borne diseases in South Florida.

It's official. Zika has come to Florida.

Four people caught the virus in a small neighborhood north of downtown Miami, Governor Rick Scott said Friday. That means mosquitoes in the neighborhood became infected with Zika and spread it.

  While Florida is focusing on the prospect of the Zika virus getting a foothold in the state, the focus in the Florida Keys is on Aedes aegypti, the mosquitoes that carry the disease.

Wikimedia Commons

Hillsborough County has confirmed its first case of West Nile Virus in a human this year.

Wikimedia Commons

After issuing a heath advisory for West Nile Virus earlier this week, the Department of Health in Pinellas County has confirmed its first case of the virus in a human since 2007.

Muhammad Mahdi Karim / Wikimedia Commons

JENSEN BEACH, FLA. — State health officials have lifted a dengue fever advisory in Martin County. 

No new cases of the mosquito-borne illness have been reported in the Rio-Jensen Beach area since September. Health officials lifted the advisory on Tuesday.

Over a five-month period, 22 people in the area developed the signs of the illness, which include high fever and aching bones.

Three Cases of Dengue Fever Confirmed

Aug 16, 2013

The Florida Department of Health released a statement urging residents to take precautions against mosquitoes, due to three Martin and St. Lucie County residents contracting dengue fever. Locally-acquired dengue is very rare in the United States, despite over 100 million cases of the mosquito-borne disease worldwide each year. Florida Department of Health Environmental Health Director Bob Washam offers some advice on how to protect yourself.

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