Medicaid cuts

Delay In Federal Approval Trims Medicaid Savings

Aug 7, 2018
iStock

Nearly $100 million the state assumed would be saved by changing a policy about patient eligibility for Medicaid won’t come to fruition this year.

A decision last week to award Medicaid contracts to two additional managed-care plans could mean more legal challenges for the state Agency for Health Care Administration.

A health care advocacy group was urging Floridians to contact the Trump administration before the end of the day Tuesday to express opposition to a state proposal that would save $98 million by making changes to how people qualify for Medicaid. 

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Democratic U.S. House members Thursday called for the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to reject a move by Gov. Rick Scott’s administration to cut $98 million by trimming the length of time people have to apply for the Medicaid program.

“I rise here today because the state of Florida has again proposed to harm thousands of seniors and folks with disabilities who rely on Medicaid for their health care,” Nelson, a Democrat who faces an election challenge this year from Scott, said on the Senate floor.

A top Florida Medicaid official has notified the federal government that Gov. Rick Scott’s administration provided incorrect information about a proposed cut to the Medicaid program.

NPR

A push by the Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott to trim nearly $100 million from the state’s main safety-net health care program for the poor is coming under fire by health-care providers and advocates for low-income families.

Nursing homes that rely the most on Medicaid tend to provide the worst care for their residents — not just the people covered by the program but also those who pay privately or have Medicare coverage.

Despite the collapse of the latest Senate effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, congressional Republicans are still keen on shrinking the amount of Medicaid money Washington sends states.

With everyone age 65 and older eligible for Medicare, seniors may be the last group that comes to mind when there's talk of Medicaid spending reductions.

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President Donald Trump’s plan to slash billions of dollars from Medicaid would hit small town America hardest, especially in Florida, according to a new Georgetown study.

GOP Medicaid Cuts Hit Rural America Hardest, Report Finds

Jun 7, 2017
Phil Galewitz/KHN

Rural America carried President Donald Trump to his election night upset last November.

Trump Country it may be, but rural counties and small towns also make up Medicaid Country — those parts of the nation whose low-income children and families are most dependent on the federal-state health insurance program, according to a report released Wednesday.

Florida House and Senate leaders have agreed to about $650 million in hospital payment cuts through Medicaid as part of a larger budget deal, reports the Tampa Bay Times.