illegal immigrants

NASA Worldview / Wikimedia

With hurricane season in full swing, staff at Florida's evacuation shelters are busy making preparations like what to do for specials needs evacuees and where to send victims of domestic violence. But this year they're practicing for a new issue — what to do if immigration officials want to take a look around.

Hundreds of protesters representing 23 advocacy groups rallied on Saturday against the Trump administration’s family separation policies at a Homestead detention center for children who crossed the Southern U.S. border.

Chants of “Hey, Trump, leave the kids alone!” remained steady throughout the protest, even when it began to rain heavily. Many of those leading chants were children themselves.

Rachel Osborn knows kids who slept in the immigrant detention centers in Texas that have dominated recent headlines.

"We have kids who will say that was the worst part of their journey," Osborn says. "They were traveling for weeks and the hardest part was being in this freezing cold room where, you know, they were fed a cold sandwich and had a thin blanket to shiver under."

And they had no parent or caregiver to comfort them and make them feel safe.

Tampa Bay Times

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Maria RodriguezOregon Health & Science University and Jens HainmuellerStanford University


A study was recently published by an associate professor of social work at Florida Gulf Coast University, and it looks at how the people living in Immokalee feel about their health.

Karla Ornelas said she has “always had the idea of being a doctor, I’ve never seen myself doing anything else.” The third-year pre-medical student at the University of California-Davis said she plans to become a family medicine physician and work in California’s Central Valley, where there is a great need for doctors and especially bilingual doctors.

At age 31, Nixon Arias cut a profile similar to many unauthorized immigrants in the United States. A native of Honduras, he had been in the country for more than a decade and had worked off and on for a landscaping company for nine years. The money he earned went to building a future for his family in Pensacola, Fla. His Facebook page was filled with photos of fishing and other moments with his three boys, ages 3, 7 and 8.

But in November 2013, that life began to unravel.

AP

Illegal immigrants aren't supposed to be covered under Medicaid except in emergencies. It turns out that emergency care adds up to a lot of money, as Phil Galewitz of Kaiser Health News reports.

AP

While U.S. Sen.Marco Rubio and other Florida lawmakers tout their support for an overhaul of immigration policies, a showdown over emergency room care for illegal immigrants continues in Florida.