iBudget

DeSantis' Budget Vetoes A 'Big Hit' To Florida's Health Care System

Jun 30, 2020
Gov. Ron DeSantis vetoed scores of health care-related projects but also cut into what is known as the "base budget, which includes programs funded with recurring dollars.
WFSU

Gov. Ron DeSantis vetoed more than $140.5 million in health care spending from the state’s new budget Monday as he brought the spending plan in line with reduced revenues stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Florida Legislature
Florida House of Representatives

While House Speaker Jose Oliva is using health care as a bargaining chip to end the 2020 legislative session, Senate Republican leaders have their own health-care priorities they want resolved in the waning days.

Disability rights advocates say a plan to revamp administration of a key program  is now moving in the right direction. Florida Republican Sen. Aaron Bean has taken the lead on changes to the Agency for Persons with Disabilities in an attempt to stop decades of budget deficits.  Advocates say changes to Bean’s proposal aren’t perfect, but they’re better than where he started.

Older hand holding another hand
NPR

House Speaker Jose Oliva recently referred to hospitals and other health care providers as modern-day “robber barons,” but a proposed spending plan unveiled Tuesday does not propose Medicaid reductions to the providers’ bottom lines. 

Changes To Disability iBudget Program Draws Concern

Jan 16, 2020

A Senate panel on Wednesday took the first steps toward overhauling a complicated and expensive program designed to help thousands of Florida residents with developmental and intellectual disabilities. 

Senate Eyes Changes For Disabilities Program

Jan 10, 2020

A legislative proposal to overhaul a program that helps Floridians with developmental and intellectual disabilities was released Thursday --- and is quickly sparking fears among people who work with the thousands of residents who rely on assistance from the state. 

DeSantis, Lawmakers Consider Reigning In Cost of Disabilities iBudget Program

Oct 30, 2019
Heather Snyder, 31st Medical Operation Squadron educational and developmental intervention services speech and language pathologist, hands a plastic coin to Nathan Gribble, a patient at the Educational and Developmental Intervention Services clinic.
Staff Sgt. Taylor L. Marr / U.S. Air Force photo

Gov. Ron DeSantis said Tuesday he’s “very open” about steps the state should take to rein in costs of caring for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities. 

Floridians With Disabilities Defend Medicaid Funding From Possible Cuts

Oct 18, 2019
Heather Snyder, 31st Medical Operation Squadron educational and developmental intervention services speech and language pathologist, hands a plastic coin to Nathan Gribble, a patient at the Educational and Developmental Intervention Services clinic.
Staff Sgt. Taylor L. Marr / U.S. Air Force photo

People with developmental disabilities and caregivers delivered a message to a Senate health-care panel Wednesday: Don’t cut Medicaid funding for services. 

Families Fret Over Announced Disability Service Redesign

Jul 18, 2019
A silouette of a family
Eric Ward / Wikimedia Commons

By Christine Sexton / News Service of Florida

Two state agencies are set to work on redesigning a Florida program that provides services to more than 34,500 people with disabilities.

And their caregivers and family members are nervous. 

After a flurry of court hearings taking aim at the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the agency must now rewrite some of their rules on how disability funding is allocated. A workshop held today on the iBudget is just one small step in a much longer narrative.

The Agency for Persons with Disabilities is attempting to recalculate how money is spent on services for disabled adults, and late last month received feedback from about 100 advocates, service providers and support coordinators, the News Service of Florida reports.

Palm Beach Post

A measure working its way through the Florida Legislature would make it more difficult to sue corporate executives, directors and other “decision-makers” when something goes wrong at their nursing homes, the Palm Beach Post reports.