homelessness

Jacksonville’s Military Affairs and Veterans Department (MAVD) is receiving a $231,750 grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to support homeless veterans. 

Charles Bowers takes long, quick strides down a worn, dirt path and stops in front of a tall thicket of bushes. He lifts a hand to signal that he's spied something.

He's leading me on a tour of camps made by homeless people in wooded corners of Fayette County, Kentucky, and there, slightly up the hill, is a patch of blue. A tent.

He keeps his voice low to avoid startling those inside.

Jacksonville has the state’s highest rate of registered sex offenders or predators without a permanent address.


  The Jacksonville nonprofit JASMYN is adding a new safety-net resource center to support homeless young people at its Riverside campus.

After finding herself in and out of homelessness for three years and receiving very little help, petty naval officer 3rd class, Ashley Esposito was at the end of her ropes when she met her “guardian angel” Seth Eisenberg.

Eisenberg is the president and founder of Operation Sacred Trust, a non profit organization that helps veterans like Ashley transition out of homelessness. Esposito is now pursuing a business degree at Florida International University, while working to help single parent veterans transition successfully into civilian life.

In recent years, the City of Fort Lauderdale has faced heavy criticism for its treatment of homelessness, including of a long-running legal dispute it's had with groups distributing free food in public spaces.

Florida Office of the Governor

The Florida Department of Children and Families will seek approval from lawmakers to shift $3.1 million to help fill a gap in funding for homeless-prevention services, Gov. Rick Scott’s office said Monday. 

Sean Baker's "The Florida Project" takes place in a blindingly purple low-budget motel named the Magic Castle, just down Route 192 from Disney's Magic Kingdom. For the children of single parents who live there, the Kissimmee, Florida, motel is a playground — even if they're living in poverty.

Florida homeless agencies are working to shelter people in the state. But proposed cuts to the Department of Housing and Urban Development could leave the state with fewer federal resources.

Bill Dickinson

The Health Care Center for the Homeless received a grant Monday from the city of Orlando to build another clinic.

A proposed “Tiny House” community for low income people is a step closer to becoming reality, despite pushback from nearby residents. The issue has been mired in controversy over whether the proposed location is suitable for the project.

At last count, during the 2013-2014 school year, the number of homeless students had risen to more than 71,000 in Florida's public schools. For many of these children, a brand-new school uniform may be out of reach, though school officials say it makes a big impact on their attitude. One longtime charity in Lakeland is quietly helping to fill that need.

When it comes to children, the definition of homeless includes more children than you may think.

Under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act children and youth who "lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence are considered homeless." That means children who are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds -- or doubled-up with relatives or friends  --are homeless, as well as those who stay in shelters, on the street or in abandoned buildings.

Storage facilities that once held only family keepsakes are becoming a refuge for homeless families, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reports.

Two Tampa Bay area legislators say local communities are better suited to help the homeless than the state, and should control more of the money meant to help.

Local housing, job training and mental health services would be at the heart of the bill filed this week by state Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, and Rep. Kathleen Peters, R-South Pasadena, according to The Tampa Tribune.

Sujatha Guduru of Oviedo had a 20-year history of mental illness. She had required hospitalization in a psychiatric ward three times, was seeing a mental-health counselor and taking psychotropic drugs. Yet Guduru was still able to walk into a local gun shop and buy a revolver.